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I have a stl::map which key type is a custom struct. I want to know if this map already has a key with a specific string as component (noted as "id" below), whatever the value of its other components. Inspired by this answer and this one also, I try to use stl::find_if with a custom functor:

map<myStruct, vector<size_t> > myMap;

struct myStruct
{
  string a, b, c, id;
};

struct checkId : unary_function<pair<myStruct, vector<size_t> >, bool>
{
private:
  string _exp;
public:
  checkId (myStruct x) : _exp(x.id) {}
  bool operator() (const pair<myStruct, vector<size_t> > & p) const
  {
    return p.first.id.compare(_exp) == 0;
  }
};

map<myStruct, vector<size_t> >::iterator it;
myStruct newS;  // to be initialized, but not shown here
it_mP2P = find_if(myMap.begin(), myMap.end(), checkId(newS));

When I compile this, gcc returns me:

/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_function.h: In member function ‘bool std::less<_Tp>::operator()(const _Tp&, const _Tp&) const [with _Tp = myStruct]’:
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_map.h:347:    instantiated from ‘_Tp& std::map<_Key,_Tp, _Compare, _Alloc>::operator[](const _Key&) [with _Key = myStruct, _Tp = std::vector<long unsigned int, std::allocator<long unsigned int> >, _Compare = std::less<myStruct>, _Alloc = std::allocator<std::pair<const myStruct, std::vector<long unsigned int, std::allocator<long unsigned int> > > >]’
myprogram.cpp:386:    instantiated from here
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.1.2/../../../../include/c++/4.1.2/bits/stl_function.h:227:  error: no match for ‘operator<’ in ‘__x < __y’

Does this mean that I have to overload the operator "<" to work with my custom struct if I want to use my functor "checkId"? How can I do this? I am not a C++ expert,so thanks in advance for any piece of code.

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1  
It looks like you need operator< (or a custom predicate) in order to create the map using myStruct as key. Nothing to do with find_if. –  UncleBens Nov 22 '11 at 21:42
    
hint: codepad.org/n7yWIRnQ It has nothing to do with your functor –  Mooing Duck Nov 22 '11 at 21:42
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

http://codepad.org/VYNqdZeF

struct myStruct
{
  std::string a, b, c, id;
  bool operator<(const myStruct& rhs) const //HERES THE MAGIC
  {return id < rhs.id;}                     //WHEEEEEEEEEEEE!
};

This is required to make std::map<myStruct, stuff> work, without passing a custom comparison functor.

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Thanks! By the way, is "rhs" supposed to stand for something? Because it's not the first time I see it. –  tflutre Nov 22 '11 at 22:03
    
LHS < RHS are "Left Hand Side" and "Right Hand Side" respectively. –  Mooing Duck Nov 22 '11 at 22:05
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It's got nothing to do with checkId. The following demonstrates the same problem:

map<myStruct, vector<size_t> > myMap;

struct myStruct
{
  string a, b, c, id;
};

std::map is a sorted map (it's usually implemented as a binary search tree)... the key type (myStruct in this case) must have operator< implemented simply to construct the map.

If you don't need fast lookups, you can just use a vector< pair< myStruct, vector<size_t> > >; if you need fast lookups, you have to add some kind of structure to myStruct. For a std::map this must be a comparison operator; alternatively you can use a std::unordered_map (in C++11; this is usually implemented as a hash table) -- in this case you will need to implement a hash function.

See the documentation of std::map and std::unordered_map for more details.

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This has nothing to do with your use of find_if.

For a type to be a key of a map, it needs to be comparable, either by implementing operator< or by providing a comparator as a template parameter of the map.

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Mooing Duck's answer is the easiest to do, but not the most flexible

if you go and write

struct myStruct
{
  std::string a, b, c, id;
  bool operator<(const myStruct& rhs) const
  {return id < rhs.id;}                    
};

then all your maps that have myStruct as a key, will have to be sorted by id.

Suppose you have one map that needs to be compared by a, and another one by b. If you put operator<() inside your myStruct, then you will have coupled the struct with its users, tightly, which is not good programming practice.

Instead, you could set a compare function to each map:

struct myStruct
{
  std::string a, b, c, id;   // keep your struct unchanged, and independent of clients
};

bool Compare_by_a(const myStruct &s1, const myStruct& s2)  {
  return s1.a < s2.a;
}                    

bool Compare_by_b(const myStruct &s1, const myStruct& s2)  {
  return s1.b < s2.b;
}                    

bool Compare_by_id(const myStruct &s1, const myStruct& s2)  {
  return s1.id < s2.id;
}                    

map<myStruct, vector<size_t>, Compare_by_a > map1;
map<myStruct, vector<size_t>, Compare_by_b > map2;
map<myStruct, vector<size_t>, Compare_by_id > map3;
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