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i'm using the python cog module to generate c++ boilerplate code, and it is working great so far, but my only concern is that the resulting code, which is ugly by itself, its made worse by the fact that is not indented. I'm too lazy to get the indentation right in the string generation function, so i'm wondering if there is a Python util function to indent the content of a multi-line string?

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What platform are you running on. On many you could use some external formatter like uncrustify, astyle or indent. –  Benjamin Bannier Nov 22 '11 at 22:05
    
@honk, this is on ubuntu 10.10 running python 2.6 –  lurscher Nov 23 '11 at 2:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why not pipe the output through a command-line code formatter such as astyle?

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the output is thrown inside the same file by cog –  lurscher Nov 23 '11 at 2:05
    
i think this can work, since in any case i have to add cog as a pre-build step, i might as well add indent or whatever in it –  lurscher Nov 23 '11 at 19:26

You can indent the lines in a string by padding each one with proper number of pad characters:

def indent(lines, amount, ch=' '):
    padding = amount * ch
    return padding + ('\n'+padding).join(lines.split('\n'))

text = '''\
And the Lord God said unto the serpent,
Because thou hast done this, thou art
cursed above all cattle, and above every
beast of the field; upon thy belly shalt
thou go, and dust shalt thou eat all the
days of thy life: And I will put enmity
between thee and the woman, and between
thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise
thy head, and thou shalt bruise his
heel.

3:15-King James
'''

print 'text indented 4 spaces:'
print indent(text, 4)

Result:

text indented 4 spaces:
    And the Lord God said unto the serpent,
    Because thou hast done this, thou art
    cursed above all cattle, and above every
    beast of the field; upon thy belly shalt
    thou go, and dust shalt thou eat all the
    days of thy life: And I will put enmity
    between thee and the woman, and between
    thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise
    thy head, and thou shalt bruise his
    heel.

    3:15-King James
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Thanks, I found this useful. However, if the text to be indented ends in a newline this will add padding afterwards, which will indent whatever comes next. So, best to add a check for that if it's important. –  Beright Oct 5 '13 at 8:16
    
@Beright: Sorry, I think you bewrong about that. The text in my answer ends with a newline. If you add a print 'another line' at the end of it that will not be indented. –  martineau Oct 5 '13 at 8:25
    
No I Beright. If you place a comma after your print statement ("print indent(text, 4),") and then, on the next line, put "print 'another line'" it will in fact be indented 4 spaces (plus an extra space from the comma) –  Beright Mar 20 '14 at 22:35
    
@Beright: Of course doing so would do that, since it supresses the newline print normally adds to the end of its output -- however it's not because the code in my answer added any extra padding regardless of whether the text to be indented ends in a newline or not. –  martineau Mar 21 '14 at 1:49
1  
@Beright: As I said, the text in the example in my answer does end in a newline -- it's right after the word "James" before the ending triple-quotes. You must mean additional newlines beyond that -- as indeed it will indent such trailing blank lines. That can easily be remedied by changing the last line to return padding + ('\n'+padding).join(lines.rstrip().split('\n')). It keeps removing the @martineau because it'll happen automatically since your comment is under my answer. –  martineau Mar 21 '14 at 15:37

There is a script located in the python Tools/Scripts/ directory which is primarily for fixing the indentation of entire python files. However, you can easily tweak the script a little and apply it to sections/lines of code, or other types of files.

The script is also located online, here:
http://svn.python.org/projects/python/trunk/Tools/scripts/reindent.py

Or, as a module here:
http://pypi.python.org/pypi/Reindent/0.1.0

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I think he wanted to format C++ code. –  Benjamin Bannier Nov 22 '11 at 22:04
    
@honk Yea, I think so too, but since the reindent.py is only a hundred or so lines of pretty simple code, what I am suggesting is to customize it a little and apply it to the c/c++. Or even subclass the Reindenter class in reindent.py to make it specific for c++. It may not be the quickest solution, but its an option ). –  chown Nov 22 '11 at 22:08

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