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#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    HelloWorld();
    return 0;
}

void HelloWorld()
{
    cout << "Hello, World" << endl;
}

I am getting the following compilation error with g++:

l1.cpp: In function 'int main()':
l1.cpp:5:15: error: 'HelloWorld' was not declared in this scope
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4  
I love how this question shot straight up the StackExchange as a "Hot Question." –  surfasb Nov 23 '11 at 6:22
2  
possible duplicate of Why prototype is required even without any class declaration? –  Rob Keniger Nov 23 '11 at 8:13
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9 Answers

up vote 68 down vote accepted

You need to either declare or define the function before you can use it. Otherwise, it doesn't know that HelloWorld() exists as a function.

Add this before your main function:

void HelloWorld();

Alternatively, you can move the definition of HelloWorld() before your main():

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void HelloWorld()
{
  cout << "Hello, World" << endl;
}

int main()
{
  HelloWorld();
  return 0;
}
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You must declare the function before you can use it:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void HelloWorld();

int main()
{
    HelloWorld();
    return 0;
}

void HelloWorld()
{
    cout << "Hello, World" << endl;
}

or you can move the definition of HelloWorld() before main()

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but you can use a class member before you declare it. So this explanation is not satisfying. –  Walter Nov 22 '11 at 22:12
14  
@Walter My explanation covers specifically his problem, and since he's new, there is no point flooding him with so much information. –  Nasreddine Nov 22 '11 at 22:15
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You need to forward declare HelloWorld() so main knows what it is. Like so:

#include <iostream>
 using namespace std;
 void HelloWorld();
 int main()
 {
   HelloWorld();
   return 0;
 }
 void HelloWorld()
 {
   cout << "Hello, World" << endl;
 }
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You need to have either a prototype of the function before the invocation or the whole function before it.

So the first is:

void HelloWorld();

int main() {
  HelloWorld();
  return 0;
}

void HelloWorld() {
  cout << "Hello, World" << endl;
}

And the second way is:

void HelloWorld() {
  cout << "Hello, World" << endl;
}

int main() {
  HelloWorld();
  return 0;
}
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There is one more possibility for some reason nobody mentioned, namely using extern declaration:

#include <iostream>
 using namespace std;
 int main()
 {
   extern void HelloWorld();
   HelloWorld();
   return 0;
 }
 void HelloWorld()
 {
   cout << "Hello, World" << endl;
 }

It's preferable when you don't want to introduce name of the function into namespace scope.

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All these answers are correct, but strangely enough, this would have worked:

 struct Hello {
   static int main() { World(); return 0; } /* note: World() not declared yet */
   static void World() { std::cout<<"Hello World"; }
 };
 int main() { return Hello::main(); } 
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1  
There is nothing strange, all members of the class are already defined inside the body of member functions. –  Gene Bushuyev Nov 23 '11 at 2:08
    
@Gene It's not immediately obvious (to a beginner/outsider anyway) why in namespace X { int a() { return b;} int b; } we have a problem, but not if we replace namespace by class (and add ; at the end). –  Walter Nov 23 '11 at 11:08
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You have to put the function before the main function.

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in C++ you need to define or at least declare the functions before calling them.

What you are trying to do till now is something like this :

int main()
{
   cout << b;
   int b = 10;
}

So you can also trying like this :

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;  

void HelloWorld();

int main()  
{
    HelloWorld();
    return 0;  
}
void HelloWorld()
{
  cout << "Hello, World" << endl;  
} 

It is a good practice in C++ to define all other functions before the main function.

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Rearrange HelloWorld() so that it appears before main():

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
void HelloWorld()
{
    cout << "Hello, World" << endl;
}
int main()
{
    HelloWorld();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

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