Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <vector>

int main()
{
   vector <class> abc;
}

when pressing some key

vector.push_back(class());

each loop

draw(vector)// what should the parameters be?

draw function

draw(vector,sizeofvector)
{
    for (int x=0;x< sizeofvector;x++)
    {draw vector[x];}
}

how should the parameters look? should i be passing an *abc?

share|improve this question
3  
class is a keyword in C++. It can never name a type. –  Kerrek SB Nov 22 '11 at 22:19
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you don't intend to modify the vector, you usually pass it by const reference.

void draw(const std::vector<T>& v)
{
    for (int x = 0; x < v.size(); x++)
    {
        // draw v[x];
    }
}

You can also use iterators (this is often preferable).

void draw(const std::vector<T>& v)
{
    for (std::vector<T>::const_iterator x = v.begin(); x != v.end(); ++x)
    {
        // draw *x;
    }
}

The reason you don't pass it by value (draw(std::vector<T> v)) is because that would cause the entire vector to be copied every time you call the function, which is obviously incredibly inefficient. References mean that you just refer to the existing vector rather than creating a new one.

share|improve this answer
    
What about iterators, is just the fundamental glue in the STL. –  K-ballo Nov 22 '11 at 22:21
    
And auto makes iterators even more convenient to type. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 22 '11 at 22:27
add comment

In modern C++ this can be answered without correcting your errors:

for (const auto & x : vector) { draw(x); }

Alternatively (still in C++11):

for (auto it = vector.cbegin(), end = vector.cend(); it != end; ++it)
{
  draw(*it);
}

This might work in C++98/03, too:

for (std::size_t i = 0, end = vector.size(); i != end; ++i) { draw(vector[i]); }
share|improve this answer
1  
can't you do the i=0, ie=vector.size() in C++98/03? Calling function on every iteration doesn't sound like fun. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 22 '11 at 22:30
    
@MichaelKrelin-hacker: You can! :-) –  Kerrek SB Nov 22 '11 at 22:30
    
Oh! So can you ;-) (+1) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 22 '11 at 22:32
add comment

std::vector is the type. You need to pass in an instance, so in your case:

draw(abc);

I also agree that your function should have prototype:

void draw( const std::vector<class> & v );
share|improve this answer
add comment
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

void addOne(int& value)
{
    value++;
}

void print(int& value)
{
    std::cout << value;
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> myVector;
    myVector.push_back(1);
    myVector.push_back(2);
    myVector.push_back(3);
    std::for_each(myVector.begin(), myVector.end(), addOne);
    std::for_each(myVector.begin(), myVector.end(), print);
}

Output: 234

wrote by hand, compiler errors possible

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.