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How do I remove from a map while iterating it? like:

std::map<K, V> map;
for(auto i : map)
    if(needs_removing(i))
        // remove it from the map

If I use map.erase it will invalidate the iterators

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Similar: stackoverflow.com/questions/1038708/… –  Christian Ammer Nov 22 '11 at 22:37
    
Even more similar: stackoverflow.com/questions/800955/… –  Kleist Nov 22 '11 at 22:47
    

3 Answers 3

up vote 45 down vote accepted

The standard associative-container erase idiom:

for (auto it = m.cbegin(); it != m.cend() /* not hoisted */; /* no increment */)
{
  if (must_delete)
  {
    m.erase(it++);
  }
  else
  {
    ++it;
  }
}

Note that we really want an ordinary for loop here, since we are modifying the container itself. The range-based loop should be strictly reserved for situations where we only care about the elements. The syntax for the RBFL makes this clear by not even exposing the container inside the loop body.

Edit. Pre-C++11, you could not erase const-iterators. There you would have to say:

for (std::map<K,V>::iterator it = m.begin(); it != m.end(); ) { /* ... */ }

Erasing an element from a container is not at odds with constness of the element. By analogy, it has always been perfectly legitimate to delete p where p is a pointer-to-constant. In other words yet, the destructor is always implicitly const.

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1  
"not even exposing the container inside the loop body" what do you mean? –  Dani Nov 22 '11 at 22:34
1  
@Dani: Well, contrast this to the 20th-century construction for (int i = 0; i < v.size(); i++). Here we have to say v[i] inside the loop, i.e. we must explicitly mention the container. The RBFL on the other hand introduces the loop variable that is directly usable as the value, and so no knowledge of the container is required inside the loop. This is a clue to the intended usage of the RBFL for loops that do not have to know about the container. Erasing is the complete opposite situation, where it's all about the container. –  Kerrek SB Nov 22 '11 at 22:41
1  
This is not standard conforming as std::map::erase(iterator) returns void not iterator. The MSDN map::erase page notes "This return type does not conform to the C++ standard." –  skyhisi Nov 22 '11 at 22:42
    
@skyhisi: Just saw myself that and fixed it, thanks! I had it mixed up in my mind with the sequence-erase idiom where you say it = v.erase(it); (no ++). It'll never happen again, promise. –  Kerrek SB Nov 22 '11 at 22:43
1  
@skyhisi: Indeed. This is one of the legitimate uses of the post-increment: First increment it to get the next, valid iterator, and then erase the old one. It doesn't work the other way round! –  Kerrek SB Nov 22 '11 at 22:55

Pretty sad, eh? The way I usually do it is build up a container of iterators instead of deleting during traversal. Then loop through the container and use map.erase()

std::map<K,V> map;
std::list< std::map<K,V>::iterator > iteratorList;

for(auto i : map ){
    if ( needs_removing(i)){
        iteratorList.push_back(i);
    }
}
for(auto i : iteratorList){
    map.erase(*i)
}
share|improve this answer
    
But after erasing one the rest will be invalid –  Dani Nov 22 '11 at 22:37
    
Nope: stackoverflow.com/questions/263945/… –  Michael Daum Nov 22 '11 at 22:49
    
@Dani: Not in a map. Erasure in map only invalidates iterator to the erased item. –  UncleBens Nov 22 '11 at 22:50

In short "How do I remove from a map while iterating it?"

  • With old map impl: You can't
  • With new map impl: almost as @KerrekSB suggested. But there are some syntax issues in what he posted.

From GCC map impl (note GXX_EXPERIMENTAL_CXX0X):

#ifdef __GXX_EXPERIMENTAL_CXX0X__
      // _GLIBCXX_RESOLVE_LIB_DEFECTS
      // DR 130. Associative erase should return an iterator.
      /**
       *  @brief Erases an element from a %map.
       *  @param  position  An iterator pointing to the element to be erased.
       *  @return An iterator pointing to the element immediately following
       *          @a position prior to the element being erased. If no such 
       *          element exists, end() is returned.
       *
       *  This function erases an element, pointed to by the given
       *  iterator, from a %map.  Note that this function only erases
       *  the element, and that if the element is itself a pointer,
       *  the pointed-to memory is not touched in any way.  Managing
       *  the pointer is the user's responsibility.
       */
      iterator
      erase(iterator __position)
      { return _M_t.erase(__position); }
#else
      /**
       *  @brief Erases an element from a %map.
       *  @param  position  An iterator pointing to the element to be erased.
       *
       *  This function erases an element, pointed to by the given
       *  iterator, from a %map.  Note that this function only erases
       *  the element, and that if the element is itself a pointer,
       *  the pointed-to memory is not touched in any way.  Managing
       *  the pointer is the user's responsibility.
       */
      void
      erase(iterator __position)
      { _M_t.erase(__position); }
#endif

Example with old and new style:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;
typedef map<int, int> t_myMap;
typedef vector<t_myMap::key_type>  t_myVec;

int main() {

    cout << "main() ENTRY" << endl;

    t_myMap mi;
    mi.insert(t_myMap::value_type(1,1));
    mi.insert(t_myMap::value_type(2,1));
    mi.insert(t_myMap::value_type(3,1));
    mi.insert(t_myMap::value_type(4,1));
    mi.insert(t_myMap::value_type(5,1));
    mi.insert(t_myMap::value_type(6,1));

    cout << "Init" << endl;
    for(t_myMap::const_iterator i = mi.begin(); i != mi.end(); i++)
        cout << '\t' << i->first << '-' << i->second << endl;

    t_myVec markedForDeath;

    for (t_myMap::const_iterator it = mi.begin(); it != mi.end() ; it++)
        if (it->first > 2 && it->first < 5)
            markedForDeath.push_back(it->first);

    for(size_t i = 0; i < markedForDeath.size(); i++)
        // old erase, returns void...
        mi.erase(markedForDeath[i]);

    cout << "after old style erase of 3 & 4.." << endl;
    for(t_myMap::const_iterator i = mi.begin(); i != mi.end(); i++)
        cout << '\t' << i->first << '-' << i->second << endl;

    for (auto it = mi.begin(); it != mi.end(); ) {
        if (it->first == 5)
            // new erase() that returns iter..
            it = mi.erase(it);
        else
            ++it;
    }

    cout << "after new style erase of 5" << endl;
    // new cend/cbegin and lambda..
    for_each(mi.cbegin(), mi.cend(), [](t_myMap::const_reference it){cout << '\t' << it.first << '-' << it.second << endl;});

    return 0;
}

prints:

main() ENTRY
Init
        1-1
        2-1
        3-1
        4-1
        5-1
        6-1
after old style erase of 3 & 4..
        1-1
        2-1
        5-1
        6-1
after new style erase of 5
        1-1
        2-1
        6-1

Process returned 0 (0x0)   execution time : 0.021 s
Press any key to continue.
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