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I have a Ruby hash that contains a user-generated string. I need to pass this hash over to JavaScript so it can be processed. I have tried using JSON, which works most of the time, but breaks when the hash contains the text </script>. Here is the simplest code that breaks in Chrome and FF8:

<%
obj = {
  :foo => '</script>'
}
%>
<script type="text/javascript">
var obj = <%= obj.to_json %>; // Results in JS syntax error
</script>

This results in the following HTML:

<script type="text/javascript">
var obj = {"foo":"</script>"};
</script>

I have also tried wrapping the JSON in quotes (both single and double) so it can be parsed via jQuery.parseJSON(), but it results in the same syntax error:

<%
obj = {
  :foo => '</script>'
}
%>
<script type="text/javascript">
var json = '<%= obj.to_json %>'; // Again results in JS syntax error
</script>

It appears that the syntax error is a result of the browser trying to interpret the </script> text as the end of the script block. My current solution is to escape the JSON string as HTML, escape remaining backslashes, write it to JS as a string, unescape the HTML, and then finally parse the JSON:

<%
obj = {
  :foo => '</script>'
}
json = obj.to_json
escaped_json = CGI.escapeHTML(json)
slashed_escaped_json = escaped_json..gsub(/['"\\\x0]/,'\\\\\0')
%>
<script type="text/javascript">
var json = "<%= slashed_escaped_json %>";
json = $('<div/>').html(json).text(); // unescape HTML
var obj = jQuery.parseJSON(json); // parse JSON safely
console.log(obj);
</script>

It works, but it's ugly. Is there a better way? I don't want to strip out </script> because I am escaping the content to HTML entities before rendering it on the page.

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4 Answers

Recently I ran in very similar problem, here is solution you may be interested in http://stackoverflow.com/q/8013277/344527

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Using a json script element should work (but can it work on older browsers)? –  Kathy Van Stone Nov 22 '11 at 23:47
    
If browser cannot recognize application/json I guess will parse it as regular javascript. Because JSON is a subset of the object literal notation of JavaScript, browser won't throw any errors. Basically you can use just <script /> tag with no attributes and should be fine. –  Wojciech Bednarski Nov 23 '11 at 0:04
    
The root of the problem is that the browser is trying to interpret the text </script> as the closing tag for the entire script. I don't see how encapsulating the JSON in its own <script> block solves the problem. –  Hector Virgen Nov 23 '11 at 0:15
    
@Hector Virgen You have the right, my solution won't help in your case. I can see two options. 1. Parse it against closing script tag. 2. Use JSON for transport information only, in this example add another key: value like script: url. I think solution 2 is better approach. –  Wojciech Bednarski Nov 23 '11 at 0:48
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If you believe it to be a problem with the browser then please show the resulting markup, not the ruby.

I've solved similar problems in the past by base64 encoding the json on the server side. Then decoding it and json.parsing it on the client side.

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I've updated the question per your comment. I've considered Base64, but instead used html encoding in my ugly solution. It achieves the same result, but still feels wrong to me :( –  Hector Virgen Nov 23 '11 at 8:05
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Is there any reason that you wouldn't just do another callback to your server to grab the JSON in another request, like this:

var foo;
jQuery.get('/your_controller/' + resource_id + '/controller_action.json', null, function(data) {
    try {
     foo = data
    } catch (e) {          
      console.log("Error get data: " + e.message);
    }
 });

I don't really know what your application is, but this is an option that works.

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1  
This is a pretty good idea, but why do two requests when it can be done in one? –  Hector Virgen Nov 23 '11 at 8:06
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

It turns out this is a bug in the "json" gem for Ruby. I've located the source on GitHub and found this pull request sitting in the queue:

https://github.com/flori/json/pull/51

The solution is to escape the forward slash, resulting in JSON like this:

{"foo":"<\/script>"}

Thanks for all your help and I hope this solution helps someone else!

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