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The problem: We have large product images we want thumbnails of at various size but don't want to be stuck batch processing the images in Photoshop. We want a dynamic way or resizing images, that wont add an extra load time while the images is processing on the backend.

Amazon does this some how with their ecommerce solution. When you upload an image it resizes the image in square format and then gives you every size imagineable. ex 150x150, 149x149, etc. Starting at the largest size of the image, so if you upload a 1024x900 image it will resize it to 1023x899, 1023x1203 (add in white space where needed), then resize every pixel until it gets to 1x1px. The some how stores all the images to the server (if it even does that)

"there's got to be a better way"

Any suggestions on the best way to handle image resize on the fly?

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Uh, are you "sure" amazon does that? I sort of doubt that... generally a few different discreet sizes are stored (but not at 1px steps!) say a "thumbnail", "small", and "normal". Depending upon image format these can be stored in different images or embedded into the same image. Additionally, some image formats are designed so that a "preview" can be obtained simply by reading less of the data overall (that is, they can be sampled). –  user166390 Nov 22 '11 at 23:21
    
2-3 years ago, when I worked on the amazon ecommerce solution, I could plug in any size smaller then the original and it would resize it proportionately. They could have ran a script every time I called the image possibly but either way, it help tremendously. –  Tom Feb 6 '12 at 23:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Dynamic image processing can be incredibly fast, and it's a much better solution than generating every possible combination of sizes for an uploaded image.

The open-source ImageResizing.Net library allows dynamic crop/zoom and resizing, and with the WIC plugin can often have round-trip times of less than 20ms. That's hard to beat. It also offers disk caching and Amazon CloudFront & S3 support if you want to scale with the big folks. It's used by 20K-60K websites, and some servers host upwards of 20TB of images.

I'm pretty sure Amazon uses cached dynamic image resizing for their eCommerce solution. Pre-generating image versions is a very 2001-era solution.

[full disclosure: I'm the author.]

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Thanks Computer Linguist. That is exactly what I was looking for. –  Tom Feb 6 '12 at 23:26

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