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I see code like this for example in Python:

    if cnt > 0 and len(aStr) > 1:
        while cnt > 0:                  
            aStr = aStr[1:]+aStr[0]
            cnt += 1

What does the += mean?

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Hi aksr, it is good etiquette to mark the answer you like as the accepted answer. It helps other people with the same question to identify a correct answer quickly :) –  Van Gale May 5 '09 at 7:03
11  
2 up votes for this question? Weird –  Ionuț G. Stan May 5 '09 at 12:48
1  
10 upvotes for this question? Even weirder. –  ThiefMaster May 9 '12 at 9:22

6 Answers 6

a += b is essentially the same as a = a + b, except that:

  • + always returns a newly allocated object, but += should (but doesn't have to) modify the object in-place if it's mutable (e.g. list or dict, but int and str are immutable).
  • In a = a + b, a is evaluated twice.

http://docs.python.org/reference/simple_stmts.html#augmented-assignment-statements


If this is the first time you encounter the += operator, you may wonder why it matters that it may modify the object in-place instead of building a new one. Here is an example:

# two variables referring to the same list
>>> list1 = []
>>> list2 = list1

# += modifies the object pointed to by list1 and list2
>>> list1 += [0]
>>> list1, list2
([0], [0])

# + creates a new, independent object
>>> list1 = []
>>> list2 = list1
>>> list1 = list1 + [0]
>>> list1, list2
([0], [])
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7  
+1 for the distinction between the two forms when used with mutable objects –  James Hopkin May 5 '09 at 9:22
2  
Minor correction: the in-place modification occurs if the object supports __iadd__() method, not if it's mutable. In particular, dictionaries don't support +=. –  Rafał Dowgird May 5 '09 at 11:06
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@Rafal: clearly if an object doesn't support +=, in-place modification won't occur :-) The subtle point is there's no guarantee that a mutable object supporting += will do in-place modification - careful code will avoid relying on this, except where it's explicitly documented. –  James Hopkin May 5 '09 at 11:17
    
@Rafal: I edited to make it more clear. –  Bastien Léonard May 5 '09 at 12:46
    
Added an example. –  Bastien Léonard May 5 '09 at 14:43
a += b

is in this case the same as

a = a + b

In this case cnt += 1 means that cnt is increased by one.

Note that the code you pasted will loop indefinitely if cnt > 0 and len(aStr) > 1.

Edit: quote Carl Meyer: ``[..] the answer is misleadingly mostly correct. There is a subtle but very significant difference between + and +=, see Bastien's answer.''.

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1  
@Stephan202 += 1 –  STW May 5 '09 at 6:12
    
thanks a lot! i never knew that. i always saw this but i never quite knew –  aksr May 5 '09 at 6:14
    
It works for other operators too. You can do x -= 1; y *= 3; z /= 10; cnt += 1; could be considered neater than cnt = cnt + 1; where there is more room for a typo ;) –  joeytwiddle May 5 '09 at 9:05
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'Is the same as' isn't quite correct. See Bastien's answer –  James Hopkin May 5 '09 at 9:23
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-1 because the answer is misleadingly mostly correct. There is a subtle but very significant difference between + and +=, see Bastien's answer. –  Carl Meyer May 5 '09 at 16:09

Google 'python += operator' leads you to http://docs.python.org/library/operator.html

Search for += once the page loads up for a more detailed answer.

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or you could just tell him it means a = a + b –  hasenj May 5 '09 at 8:43
4  
and have him come back for 'what is -=?' 'what is *=?' :) no thanks. Anyways the top voted ans already did that before I posted. –  Gishu May 5 '09 at 9:45
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+1: Link to the documentation. –  S.Lott May 5 '09 at 10:09
1  
+1 for providing the link (helpful), but -1 for not summarizing, which you could have done in one sentence. Net: 0 –  Graeme Perrow May 5 '09 at 13:02

FYI: it looks like you might have an infinite loop in your example...

if cnt > 0 and len(aStr) > 1:
    while cnt > 0:                  
        aStr = aStr[1:]+aStr[0]
        cnt += 1
  • a condition of entering the loop is that cnt is greater than 0
  • the loop continues to run as long as cnt is greater than 0
  • each iteration of the loop increments cnt by 1

The net result is that cnt will always be greater than 0 and the loop will never exit.

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1  
Not necessarily forever - if cnt is an int, it will eventually overflow and go negative, so the loop will finally exit after a couple billion iterations if you're on a machine with 32-bit ints (or sometime around the heat death of the universe if you're on a machine with 64-bit ints.) –  Charlie Tangora May 5 '09 at 6:56
    
@Charlie: Python handles overflowing automatically. Tested with Python 2.5: sys.maxint + 1 == 2147483648L and isinstance(sys.maxint + 1, int) == False. As of Python 3.0 the distinction between int and long is even gone (no more long, int is a 'bignum'). –  Stephan202 May 5 '09 at 7:08
    
(Obviously on 64bit we have sys.maxint + 1 == 9223372036854775808L, but the point is that the result is automatically converted to long) –  Stephan202 May 5 '09 at 7:12

+= is the in-place addition operator.

It's the same as doing cnt = cnt + 1. For example:

>>> cnt = 0
>>> cnt += 2
>>> print cnt
2
>>> cnt += 42
>>> print cnt
44

The operator is often used in a similar fashion to the ++ operator in C-ish languages, to increment a variable by one in a loop (i += 1)

There are similar operator for subtraction/multiplication/division/power and others:

i -= 1 # same as i = i - 1
i *= 2 # i = i * 2
i /= 3 # i = i / 3
i **= 4 # i = i ** 4

The += operator also works on strings, for example:

>>> s = "Hi"
>>> s += " there"
>>> print s
Hi there

People tend to recommend against doing this for performance reason, but for the most scripts this really isn't an issue. To quote from the "Sequence Types" docs:

  1. If s and t are both strings, some Python implementations such as CPython can usually perform an in-place optimization for assignments of the form s=s+t or s+=t. When applicable, this optimization makes quadratic run-time much less likely. This optimization is both version and implementation dependent. For performance sensitive code, it is preferable to use the str.join() method which assures consistent linear concatenation performance across versions and implementations.

The str.join() method refers to doing the following:

mysentence = []
for x in range(100):
    mysentence.append("test")
" ".join(mysentence)

..instead of the more obvious:

mysentence = ""
for x in range(100):
    mysentence += " test"

The problem with the later is (aside from the leading-space), depending on the Python implementation, the Python interpreter will have to make a new copy of the string in memory every time you append (because strings are immutable), which will get progressively slower the longer the string to append is.. Whereas appending to a list then joining it together into a string is a consistent speed (regardless of implementation)

If you're doing basic string manipulation, don't worry about it. If you see a loop which is basically just appending to a string, consider constructing an array, then "".join()'ing it.

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it means "append "THIS" to the current value"

example:

a = "hello"; a += " world";

printing a now will output: "hello world"

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2  
no, it doesn't mean append –  hasenj May 5 '09 at 8:43
    
Please, for the love of Satan, do not use this for building strings. StringIO and cStringIO are here for this purpose. –  Romme May 5 '09 at 9:40
    
building strings: "".join( ITERABLE_OF_STRINGS ) also performs well. –  bendin May 5 '09 at 15:09
    
It means append when used on strings.. "".join() is better performing, but it's stupid to use that for a short strings like in the example. You use "".join() when concat'ing strings in a loop, but for one-of uses, += is fine –  dbr May 5 '09 at 15:17

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