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How can I figure out the size of a file, in bytes?

#include <stdio.h>

unsigned int fsize(char* file){
  //what goes here?
}
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12 Answers 12

up vote 68 down vote accepted

Based on NilObject's code:

#include <sys/stat.h>

off_t fsize(const char *filename) {
    struct stat st; 

    if (stat(filename, &st) == 0)
        return st.st_size;

    return -1; 
}

Changes:

  • Made the filename argument a const char.
  • Corrected the struct stat definition, which was missing the variable name.
  • Returns -1 on error instead of 0, which would be ambiguous for an empty file. off_t is a signed type so this is possible.

If you want fsize() to print a message on error, you can use this:

#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <errno.h>

off_t fsize(const char *filename) {
    struct stat st;

    if (stat(filename, &st) == 0)
        return st.st_size;

    fprintf(stderr, "Cannot determine size of %s: %s\n",
            filename, strerror(errno));

    return -1;
}

On 32-bit systems you should compile this with the option -D_FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64, otherwise off_t will only hold values up to 2 GB. See the "Using LFS" section of Large File Support in Linux for details.

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5  
This is Linux/Unix specific--probably worth pointing that out since the question didn't specify an OS. –  Drew Hall Aug 2 '10 at 21:54
1  
You could probably change the return type to ssize_t and cast the size from an off_t without any trouble. It would seem to make more sense to use a ssize_t :-) (Not to be confused with size_t which is unsigned and cannot be used to indicate error.) –  Ted Percival Aug 6 '10 at 17:03

Don't use int. Files over 2 gigabytes in size are common as dirt these days

Don't use unsigned int. Files over 4 gigabytes in size are common as some slightly-less-common dirt

IIRC the standard library defines off_t as an unsigned 64 bit integer, which is what everyone should be using. We can redefine that to be 128 bits in a few years when we start having 16 exabyte files hanging around.

If you're on windows, you should use GetFileSizeEx - it actually uses a signed 64 bit integer, so they'll start hitting problems with 8 exabyte files. Foolish Microsoft! :-)

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2  
+1 for portability –  Luca Martini Mar 28 '12 at 9:25
4  
Haha, +1 for some slightly-less-common dirt! :-D –  Prof. Falken May 25 '12 at 14:27

Matt's solution should work, except that it's C++ instead of C, and the initial tell shouldn't be necessary.

unsigned long fsize(char* file)
{
    FILE * f = fopen(file, "r");
    fseek(f, 0, SEEK_END);
    unsigned long len = (unsigned long)ftell(f);
    fclose(f);
    return len;
}

Fixed your brace for you, too. ;)

Update: This isn't really the best solution. It's limited to 4GB files on Windows and it's likely slower than just using a platform-specific call like GetFileSizeEx or stat64.

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Yes, you should. However, unless there's a really compelling reason not write platform-specific, though, you should probably just use a platform-specific call rather than the open/seek-end/tell/close pattern. –  Derek Park Apr 18 '12 at 4:10
1  
Sorry about the late reply, but I am having a major issue here. It causes the app to hang when accessing restricted files (like password protected or system files). Is there a way to ask the user for a password when needed? –  Justin Mar 29 '13 at 3:34
    
@Justin, you should probably open a new question specifically about the issue you're running into, and provide details about the platform you're on, how you're accessing the files, and what the behavior is. –  Derek Park Apr 2 '13 at 15:04
    
Both C99 and C11 return long int from ftell(). (unsigned long) casting does not improve the range as already limited by the function. ftell() return -1 on error and that get obfuscated with the cast. Suggest fsize() return the same type as ftell(). –  chux Jan 12 at 22:03
    
I agree. The cast was to match the original prototype in the question. I can't recall why I turned it into unsigned long instead of unsigned int, though. –  Derek Park Jan 27 at 22:09

**Don't do this (why?):

Quoting the C99 standard doc that i found online: "Setting the file position indicator to end-of-file, as with fseek(file, 0, SEEK_END), has undefined behavior for a binary stream (because of possible trailing null characters) or for any stream with state-dependent encoding that does not assuredly end in the initial shift state.**

Change the definition to int so that error messages can be transmitted, and then use fseek() and ftell() to determine the file size.

int fsize(char* file) {
  int size;
  FILE* fh;

  fh = fopen(file, "rb"); //binary mode
  if(fh != NULL){
    if( fseek(fh, 0, SEEK_END) ){
      fclose(fh);
      return -1;
    }

    size = ftell(fh);
    fclose(fh);
    return size;
  }

  return -1; //error
}
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3  
Here is the report that unequivocally states that you should not do that: <a href="securecoding.cert.org/confluence/x/QwCMAg">FIO19-C. Do not use fseek() and ftell() to compute the size of a file</a>. It would be nice if you add this link to your answer, so the other people could see that clearly. –  mezhaka Aug 2 '10 at 15:23
    
thanks. how's that? –  andrewrk Aug 2 '10 at 21:53
4  
@mezhaka: That CERT report is simply wrong. fseeko and ftello (or fseek and ftell if you're stuck without the former and happy with limits on the file sizes you can work with) are the correct way to determine the length of a file. stat-based solutions do not work on many "files" (such as block devices) and are not portable to non-POSIX-ish systems. –  R.. Oct 24 '10 at 4:30
2  
That securecoding link is now broken. –  hippietrail Apr 5 '11 at 0:18
1  
This is the only way to get the file size on many non-posix compliant systems (such as my very minimalistic mbed) –  Earlz Mar 2 '12 at 23:36

If you're fine with using the std c library:

#include <sys/stat.h>
off_t fsize(char *file) {
    struct stat;
    if (stat(file, &stat) == 0) {
        return stat.st_size;
    }
    return 0;
}
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12  
That's not standard C. It's part of the POSIX standard, but not the C standard. –  Derek Park Aug 11 '08 at 21:32
2  
@DerekPark That's not even correct C. stat is here both an unspecified structure and a function. –  jlliagre Nov 1 '13 at 14:22

And if you're building a Windows app, use the GetFileSizeEx API as CRT file I/O is messy, especially for determining file length, due to peculiarities in file representations on different systems ;)

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A quick search in Google found a method using fseek and ftell and a thread with this question with answers that it can't be done in just C in another way.

You could use a portability library like NSPR (the library that powers Firefox) or check its implementation (rather hairy).

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You're going to need to use a library function to retrieve the details of a file. As C is completely platform independent, you're going to need to let us know what platform / operating system you're developing for!

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I used this set of code to find the file length.

//opens a file with a file descriptor
FILE * i_file;
i_file = fopen(source, "r");

//gets a long from the file descriptor for fstat
long f_d = fileno(i_file);
struct stat buffer;
fstat(f_d, &buffer);

//stores file size
long file_length = buffer.st_size;
fclose(i_file);
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Looking at the question

ftell can easily get the Number of Bytes

  long size ;
  size =ftell(FILENAME);
  printf("total size is %ld bytes",size);
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as long as you have "iostream" available, you can do the following:

unsigned int fsize(char* file){
  long begin,end;
  ifstream myfile (file);
  begin = myfile.tellg();
  myfile.seekg (0, ios::end);
  end = myfile.tellg();  
  return end-begin;
}

is the idea. My C++ chops are a little creaky, so pushing a char* to an ifstream might not work as I wrote it... a good look at tellg() and seekg() will help you get the details.

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You can open the file, go to 0 offset relative from the bottom of the file with

#define SEEKBOTTOM   2

fseek(handle, 0, SEEKBOTTOM)

the value returned from fseek is the size of the file.

I didn't code in C for a long time, but I think it should work.

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8  
You shouldn't have to define something like SEEKBOTTOM. #include <stdio.h> fseek(handle, 0, SEEK_END); –  sigjuice Mar 26 '09 at 5:33

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