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I'm having an issue with scanf() getting stuck, and the only way to continue the program is to type exit.

My input is something like this:

L 1 1 3 4 C 2 3 4

where the numbers are the parameters for L and C.

int main ()
{
// Get use input and put in array
int count, x;
int array[4];
char type;

scanf("%c", &type);

for (x = 0; x < 2; x++)
{
    if (type == 'L')
    {
        for (count = 0; count < 4; count++)
        {
            scanf("%d", &array[count]);
        }

    } else if (type == 'C')
    {
        for (count = 0; count < 3; count++)
        {
            scanf("%d", &array[count]);
        }

    } 
    if (scanf("%*[ \n\t]%c", &type) == 0)
    {
        printf("Error");
        break;
    }
}

The scanf statement in question:

scanf("%*[ \n\t]%c", &type)

works fine if I'm not at the end of the line, but breaks otherwise. However, I won't know how many L and C objects I will have so can't rely on the value from the for loop.

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I'm kind of lost by your question. This code reads exactly two blocks (each L # # # # or C # # #), skips over whitespace, reads one more character, and then exits. What is it supposed to do? You make it sound like it's supposed to keep reading –  Michael Mrozek Nov 23 '11 at 2:01
    
At the moment it reads only two but I'm changing it to a while loop so that I can read an unknown number of blocks. I'm having trouble finding when I've read all the blocks though because the scanf when reading the last character is getting stuck, although technically all the characters have been read so I'm guessing this is the source of why it gets stuck. –  Denis Nov 23 '11 at 2:16
    
Check the return values from every scanf() call; it could be one of the others that is failing and causing problems for the next one. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 23 '11 at 2:26
    
Checked it and they're not failing. –  Denis Nov 23 '11 at 2:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think your problem is here:

if (scanf("%*[ \n\t]%c", &type) == 0)

You're trying to check if you're out of characters to read, so you want to check if scanf returns EOF (which is -1, but just use the EOF constant). If you break when you see EOF returned you'll drop out of the loop as soon as you end input to the process (Ctrl+D on Linux, I believe Ctrl+Z Enter on Windows)

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Thanks. I thought EOF was a newline but obviously not, so I'm going to use getline() to read the whole line so I know it's the whole line. –  Denis Nov 23 '11 at 2:44

If your data is line-oriented, you would probably do better with reading lines using fgets() or possibly getline() from POSIX 2008, and then using sscanf() to parse the lines.

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