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I've been searching for a while and the closest thing to an answer was over there

toString override in C++

However I was not able to make it work in my class.

I have a Table2D.h which contains this:

std::string toString() const;
std::ostream & operator<<( std::ostream & o, const Table2D<T> & s );

and I have a template class Table2D.template which contains this:

template <class T>
std::ostream & :: operator<<( std::ostream & o, const Table2D<T> & s ){
    return out << s.toString();
}

when I call my toString() function from main, it functions correctly. However when I invoke the << operator using a std::cout I get the following errors.

Table2D.h(59): error C2804: binary 'operator <<' has too many parameters
Table2D.h(85) : see reference to class template instantiation 'Table2D<T>' being compiled
Table2D.template(100): error C2039: '<<' : is not a member of '`global namespace''
Table2D.h(59): error C2804: binary 'operator <<' has too many parameters

just so you know the 59'th line contains

for (unsigned y=0; y<m_height; y++) col_ptr[y] = (T) col_ptr_src[y];

which as you see contains no <<'s so I'm not entirely certain what it's referring to.


Edit:

After removing the declaration from the class, I replaced it's entry in the header file with this

template <class T>
std::ostream& operator<<( std::ostream& o, const Table2D<T>& s ) {
    return o << s.toString();
}

and got the following error:

Table2D.h(60): error C2804: binary 'operator <<' has too many parameters
Table2D.h(89) : see reference to class template instantiation 'Table2D<T>' being compiled

the 89th line in the template file contains std::stringstream resultStream;

which is the very first line in my toString function, which looks like this

template <class T>
std::string Table2D<T> :: toString() const{
    std::stringstream resultStream;
    for(unsigned i = 0; i< m_height; i++){
        for (unsigned j = 0; j < m_width; j++){
            resultStream << (*this)[i][j] << "\t";
        }
        resultStream << endl;
    }
    return resultStream.str();
}
share|improve this question
    
thank's @pst I'm having a lot of trouble identifying errors with c++ so my question names can be a little off. Thank's again. – vvMINOvv Nov 23 '11 at 2:38
1  
In case you don't know, click on the number circled in red on the top left of the page to see the comments directed at you via the @-symbol. If you do you'll see my comment to you in my answer. – Seth Carnegie Nov 23 '11 at 2:49
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Aside from your syntax being wrong1, operator<< overloads on other classes (ostream in this case) must be non-member functions. Change your definition to

template <class T>
std::ostream& operator<<( std::ostream& o, const Table2D<T>& s ) {
    return o << s.toString();
}

and remove its declaration from the class completely so that it is a free function.


1 In case you want to know why, member-function binary operators only take one argument, because the left side is the invoking object, accessed via this. Also, you forgot the Table2D<T> before the :: in the definition. But even if you fixed these it wouldn't work as intended because, as previously stated, operator overloading on other classes must be done through free functions.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know how to post code in these comment boxes so I'll just edit my post with the reply gimme a sec – vvMINOvv Nov 23 '11 at 2:37
1  
@vvMINOvv update your code in your question to reflect exactly what you're compiling now, and update the error you're getting (copy and paste it, don't try to type it). – Seth Carnegie Nov 23 '11 at 2:37
1  
@vvMINOvv just to make sure, you have template <typename T> above the operator<< thing, and also it is completely outside the class, right? Not inside the class's curly braces? And yeah, SO is a cool place. – Seth Carnegie Nov 23 '11 at 2:45
1  
@vvMINOvv yeah, it shouldn't be under public, it should be outside the class completely. Example: pastebin.com/suy0tQ0Z – Seth Carnegie Nov 23 '11 at 2:54
1  
@vvMINOvv because of the type of s, yes. The compiler knows everything about it (because of its type which it has already seen) including all its member functions, so it knows what to do. – Seth Carnegie Nov 23 '11 at 3:06

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