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I've written some code that contains a main and a number of subclasses that inherit variables from a superclass.

E.g.

class superclass(object):
    def __init__(self, var1, var2):
        self.var1 = var1
        self.var2 = var2

class subclass1(superclass):
    def method1(self):
        pass

class subclass2(superclass):
    def method1(self):
        pass

The main isn't shown, nor an option factory which is used to choose the subclass to call, but hopefully the info given will be sufficient.

I wish to convert those classes to standalone modules that can be imported. It is expected that additional subclasses will be written in the future so I was wondering if it is possible to save each subclass and the superclass as seperate modules and that the subclasses will still be able to use/have access too the superclass variables and definitions.

The reasoning behind this is to simplify the writing of any future subclasses. Meaning they can be written as a stand alone module and the previous subclasses and the superclass don't have to be touched as part of the development, but they will still be able to use the suberclasses variables and definitions.

I'm not sure how it would work or if it can be done that way. Whether I just save all the classes as superclass.py, subclass1.py and subclass2.py and import them all?????

Hope that made sense.

Thanks.

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The class structure is entirely independent from package structure: in the case of class subclass1(superclass), note that superclass is just an expression -- just make sure it evaluates to the desired superclass, which might require importing or whatnot. (Although sensibility usually dictates that the package structure and class hierarchy are supporting.) –  user166390 Nov 23 '11 at 3:42

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, its totally possible. Just don't forget to import superclass in the subclass file:

from module_where_superclass_is import SuperClass

class SubClass(SuperClass):

    def method1(self):
        # ...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks to all the replies, always simple once you know :), can't believe I didn't think to just import the superclass into the subclass. Couldn't see the forest through the trees. Thanks again, always found a great bunch of people on stackoverflow. –  user788462 Nov 23 '11 at 3:55
    
@user788462, glad I help! Sometimes, the easiest things are the harder to see. If we solved your problem, pick the best answer as your accepted answer :) –  juliomalegria Nov 23 '11 at 4:00

Sure, no problem. You would just do it like

import ModuleWithSuperclass

class subclass1(ModuleWithSuperclass.superclass):
    def method1(self):
        pass
share|improve this answer

In superclass.py:

class superclass(object):
    def __init__(self, var1, var2):
        self.var1 = var1
        self.var2 = var2

Then in subclass1.py:

from superclass import superclass
class subclass1(superclass):
    def method1(self):
        pass
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You can subclass any class that exists in the namespace.

If your superclass exists in some weird location you can add it to your script via this answer

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I suggest you have a read of the python modules tutorial. It will give you a lot more information on how you can arrange your classes into hierarchically arranged modules and packages.

share|improve this answer
    
I had a quick skim of the Module tutorial but didn't initiailly see what what I was looking for. I'll give it a more thorough read. –  user788462 Nov 23 '11 at 3:50

Yes, obviously that is possible - That is the beauty of python !

Module 1

class base:
    def p(self):
        print "Hello Base"

Module 2

from module1 import base

class subclass(base):
    def pp(self):
        print "Hello child"

Python Shell

from module2 import subclass
ob = subclass()
ob.p()
"Hello Base"
ob.pp()
"Hello child"

:)

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hmm, it will definitely work, but there is always a however.

if for example you used answer from @juliomalegria, you may find it hard to get all the sub-classes from the parent, that said, in your python-shell, if you go:

from module_where_superclass_is import SuperClass
SuperClass.__subclasses__()

you get nothing, unless you go:

from module_where_superclass_is import SubClass
SuperClass.__subclasses__()

then you can see the correct result comes out.

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