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My idea is any one of the objects should exist for all the subclasses of a Singleton class. The code that I have been trying and the result matrix is given below. The matrix seems to be working fine in the case of subclasses. Am I going the wrong way? Did it get what happens in the case of a Parent class object and a subclass object?

class Singleton(object):
    _instance = None
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        if not cls._instance:
            cls._instance = super(Singleton, cls).__new__(
                                cls, *args, **kwargs)
        return cls._instance

class A(Singleton):
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        super(A, cls).__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)

class B(Singleton):
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        super(B, cls).__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)

class C(B):
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        super(B, cls).__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    s1=Singleton()
    s2=Singleton()
    if(id(s1)==id(s2)):
        print "Same"
    else:
        print "Different"

'''
I got a result matrix for s1 and s2
           |************ s2 **************************|           
s1         |Singleton() |A()      | B()     | C()     |
===========|==========================================|
Singleton()|Same        |Different|Different|Different|
A()        |Different   |Same     |Same     |Same     |
B()        |Different   |Same     |Same     |Same     |
C()        |Different   |Same     |Same     |Same     |
'''
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2  
A singleton is inherently equivalent to a global variable, only it obfuscates that fact with extra code that can go subtly wrong. Why not just do class A(object): ... then create a global instance immediately after with a = A()? You get a single global instance that looks like a single global instance, and it's available in exactly the same scope. If lazy initialization is what you want there are ways to achieve that that actually look like that's what you're doing. –  Ben Nov 23 '11 at 6:06
    
If you fix the error where your subclasses don't return anything, you get very strange behaviour. If you do s1=Singleton() then s2=A() then they'll both be the same object (an instance of Singleton), but if you do s1=A() then s2=Singleton() they'll be different objects (an instance of A and an instance of Singleton respectively). –  Ben Nov 23 '11 at 7:13
    
Which means in some distant part of your program A().method_of_a() will either work or throw an exception (or inexplicably call a super-class implementation), depending on whether Singleton was already instantiated. I cannot imagine how this could be desired behaviour; what do you intend to do with this hierarchy of singleton classes? –  Ben Nov 23 '11 at 7:15
    
This gave me some light. I have been trying to avoid an explicit checking for each subclass whether any instance (global instance) exists for each subclass. Now I think such a check is required for each subclass –  user1061147 Nov 23 '11 at 9:46
    
A singleton that can be subclassed is inherently a contradiction in terms. Either you violate the class invariant that makes it a singleton, or you violate LSP. –  Karl Knechtel Nov 23 '11 at 12:07

2 Answers 2

The code looks fine but it doesn't make sense to pick one singleton value to be shared for a class and its subclasses. The whole point of a subclass is to be different in some way from the parent class and from sibling subclasses. It seems odd to me that each class doesn't have its own distinct singleton instance.

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None of the subclasses' __new__() methods have an explicit return statement, so they all return None. That's why their new instances are all the same. With this code, they'll be the same as Singleton() too:

class Singleton(object):
    _instance = None
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        if not cls._instance:
            cls._instance = super(Singleton, cls).__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)
        return cls._instance

class A(Singleton):
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        return super(A, cls).__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)

class B(Singleton):
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        return super(B, cls).__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)

class C(B):
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        return super(C, cls).__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)

It's not even necessary to define __new__() for the subclasses:

class A(Singleton):
    pass

class B(Singleton):
    pass

class C(B):
    pass
share|improve this answer
    
Note that with this code if I ever instantiate a Singleton directly, (not through a subclass), then it will set _instance on Singleton. This means that all further subclasses that get instantiated will find a non-None cls._instance in their MRO, and will return that instead of creating an instance of themselves. –  Ben Nov 23 '11 at 6:02
1  
I understood that to be the desired behavior. –  Michael Hoffman Nov 23 '11 at 6:20
    
I doubt that, though I think the flaw is really in the design, not in your code. I can't think of a plausible situation in which that behaviour would be useful, rather than a bug. I think the poster probably doesn't intend to instantiate Singleton directly (or create further subclasses of the Singleton subclasses). –  Ben Nov 23 '11 at 6:48
1  
The OP said that the desired behavior was for id(s1) == id(s2) and said it was "working fine" when s1 and s2 were both subclasses, but not where one was Singleton and the other was a subclass. Since the test code includes direct instantiation of Singleton it's hard to see how that would not be intended. As far as the design goes, as you point out singleton-enforcing classes are neither necessary nor really a good idea in Python. But I just work here. –  Michael Hoffman Nov 23 '11 at 7:00
    
Oh! I'm sorry. You're quite right, and I wasn't reading close enough. That seems absurd. –  Ben Nov 23 '11 at 7:10

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