Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a PHP file imported by a require_once() call in another PHP file that is autoloaded. In this file there are a small number of string global variables defined:

$foobar = "foo";
$bazqux = "baz";

class FooClass {
    private $foo;

    public function __construct() {
        global $foobar;
        $this->foo = $foobar; // $foobar is <null> here
    }
}

However, when I run this code the global variable $foobar is "" according to XDebug under Apache2 (I'm using VS.php as my IDE). I get the same problem when I run the script under normal PHP FastCGI under IIS .

I've gone through all my code and the symbol "$foobar" only appears in this source file so it isn't being overwritten elsewhere.

I since changed it from a global variable to a define() constant and it works fine.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use the superglobal - $GLOBALS.

$this->foo = $GLOBALS["foobar"];

EDIT:

<?php
$foobar = "foo";
$bazqux = "baz";

class FooClass {
    private $foo;

    public function __construct() {
        global $foobar;
        $this->foo = $foobar;  
    }
    function display() {
      print $this->foo;
    }
}

$a=new FooClass;
print $a->display();
?>
share|improve this answer
    
Why is this necessary? –  Dai Nov 23 '11 at 4:50
    
Both are valid and work well at my end. You may use automatic global or superglobal $GLOBALS. –  AVD Nov 23 '11 at 4:53
    
@David it is not necessary but require paying less attention (frankly - no attention at all) tho the current variable scope –  Your Common Sense Nov 23 '11 at 5:06
    
It turns out that, in my PHP installation at least, globals defined in one PHP file X (which is then include()ed in another PHP file Y) aren't made available within Y unless you use the $_GLOBALS collection. –  Dai Aug 25 '12 at 13:25

Code is working fine for me. Nothing wrong with the code. It is giving me output as foo:

$foobar = "foo";
$bazqux = "baz";

class FooClass {
    private $foo;

    public function __construct() {
        global $foobar;
        $this->foo = $foobar; // $foobar is foo here
   }
}
share|improve this answer

Just because those two variable declarations are the first thing in the include script doesn't mean they are actually in the global scope.

Including a script from within a function (your autoloader) would make them reside in that functions local scope. You won't notice since your autoloader scope wouldn't even keep them.

Solution: Also use the global statement before assigning the vars topmost in your script.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.