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I'm trying to create a list by adding a number to an existing list. The problem is that the existing list is not necessarily actually a list. It could be either an empty list ((list )), just a number, or an actual list.

Basically, I need something like append but it has to be able to handle this case:

(append 1 2) and generate a list (list 1 2)

In addition to the typical case:

(append (list 1 2) 3)

Using append for the first case gives me the error append: expected argument of type <proper list>; given 1

Is there something like append that can handle both of these cases? Or is there some other way to do this?

Thanks!

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It seems an homework to me (you should tag accordingly). By the way there is the list? function that can help you –  Eineki Nov 23 '11 at 6:19
    
Which language level do you use? –  Eineki Nov 23 '11 at 6:26
    
I'm just trying to learn scheme. This isn't homework. –  Computerish Nov 23 '11 at 6:40
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this simple program and tell me if it solve your issue:

#lang racket
(define (apnd a b)
   (flatten (cons a b)) 
)

#test
(apnd 1 2)
(apnd (list 1 2) (list 3 4))
(apnd '() 1)
(apnd 1 '())
(apnd '() '())
(apnd (list 1 2) 3)
(apnd 1 (list 2 3))

References: flatten

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Here's a pretty straightforward solution, following the design recipe from How to Design Programs.

;; An Input is one of
;; - Number
;; - Listof[Number]

;; to-list : Input -> Listof[Number]
;; convert the input to a list if necessary
(define (to-list v)
  (cond [(number? v) (list v)]
        [else v]))

;; append* : Input Input -> Listof[Number]
;; append two inputs, converting to lists first if necessary
(define (append* a b)
  (append (to-list a) (to-list b)))
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Welcome to Racket v5.1.1.
-> ;; First, you gave this example
(append (list 1 2) 3)
'(1 2 . 3)
-> ;; but notice that's not a proper list
(list? '(1 2 . 3))
#f
-> ;; you probably meant
(append (list 1 2) (list 3))
'(1 2 3)
-> ;; which is a list
(list? '(1 2 3))
#t
-> ;; I would make something like Sam's function
;; but it converts anything to a list
(define (any->list x)
  (cond
   [(list? x) x]
   [else (list x)]))
-> ;; So for example:
(any->list 1)
'(1)
-> (any->list (list 1))
'(1)
-> ;; and then you use that in a variation of append
(define (my-append a b)
  (append (any->list a) (any->list b)))
-> ;; so you can do any of these:
(my-append 1 2)
'(1 2)
-> (my-append '(1) 2)
'(1 2)
-> (my-append 1 '(2))
'(1 2)
-> (my-append '(1) '(2))
'(1 2)
-> 
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I would write a function to do this.

Edit: As the other person said, this does seem like homework. Basically you want to use a conditional in a function to check if it is a list and act accordingly.

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