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Which one of these solutions looks nicer, and is more clearer?

In form's constructor:

textBox1.KeyDown += delegate(object o, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.KeyCode== Keys.Enter)
    {
        button1.PerformClick();
    }
};

Or:

private void textBox1_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)

    {
        if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Return) 
        {
            button1.PerformClick();
        }
    }
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The choice of the implementation depends upon your requirements that we don't know exactly and that may change over time.

As long as your handler is not supposed to be added or removed dynamically or to contain any data that is known only at runtime I see no reason to wrap it into a delegate and add to your form. And you will need to implement your own destructor/Dispose() method to explicitly remove this handler to prevent memory leaks.

So, the second solution with static handler seems to me to be optimal here. You can then easily see what event handlers your textBox1 control actually implements directly in the properties of the control in Visual Studio and don't have to look for this handler implementation through your code if you need to modify it later.

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Thanks Alexander :) –  Mouliyan Nov 23 '11 at 7:16
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It depends: if you could do it at design time I prefer the second.
If you use the first, remember to use textBox1.KeyDown -= before closing your form to avoid memory leaks.

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According to me, the second is more clearly and look nicer, but the first help developers coding faster.

But, two solutions depend on your purpose.

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The first one looks OK when you only have one event handler. However, what if you have 10 or 20? That would result in a pretty bloated constructor. It's definitely better to have the event handler, but even then it's best not to have a lot of business logic in an event handler.

Also, the uses of delegates in the constructor would prevent edit and continue from working.

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Thanks Eric.. +1 –  Mouliyan Nov 23 '11 at 8:22
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It is a matter of style, but, personally, I avoid making anonymous delegates with more than one line of code. For instance, this works form me

btnSave.Click += (sender, e) => Save();

@Marco, Alexander: How can one leak memory with those event handlers? I think it happens only if event source is static.

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