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Could anyone explain me why the generics list's Contains() function is so slow?
I have a List with about a million numbers, and the code that is constantly checking if there's a specific number within these numbers.
I tried doing the same thing using Dictionary and the ContainsKey() function, and it was about 10-20 times faster than with the List.
Of course, I don't really want to use Dictionary for that purpose, because it wasn't meant to be used that way.
So, the real question here is, is there any alternative to the List.Contains(), but not as whacky as Dictionary.ContainsKey() ?
Thanks in advance!

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1  
What problem with Dictionary? It's intended for use in case like yours. –  Kamarey May 5 '09 at 8:26
3  
@Kamarey: HashSet may be a better option. –  Brian Rasmussen May 5 '09 at 8:28
    
HashSet is what I was looking for. –  DSent May 5 '09 at 8:47

9 Answers 9

up vote 84 down vote accepted

If you are just checking for existance, HashSet<T> in .NET 3.5 is your best option - dictionary-like performance, but no key/value pair - just the values:

    HashSet<int> data = new HashSet<int>();
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
    {
        data.Add(rand.Next(50000000));
    }
    bool contains = data.Contains(1234567); // etc
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1  
Thanks, that's exactly what I need! Gotta check these new features in .NET 3.5 –  DSent May 5 '09 at 8:45

List.Contains is a O(n) operation.

Dictionary.ContainsKey is a O(1) operation, since it uses the hashcode of the objects as a key, which gives you a quicker search ability.

I don't think that it 's a good idea to have a List which contains a million entries. I don't think that the List class was designed for that purpose. :)

Isn't it possible to save those millon entities into a RDBMS for instance, and perform queries on that database ?

If it is not possible, then I would use a Dictionary anyway.

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@Frederik Gheysels: good point! –  Mitch Wheat May 5 '09 at 8:26
9  
I don't think there's anything inappropriate about a list with a million items, it's just that you probably don't want to keep running linear searches across it. –  Will Dean May 5 '09 at 8:28
    
I ended up using HashSet<T> for my task, but thanks anyway! –  DSent May 5 '09 at 8:45
    
Agreed, there's nothing wrong with a list nor an array with that many entries. Just don't scan for values. –  Michael Krauklis Nov 30 '10 at 16:38

Dictionary isn't that bad, because the keys in a dictionary are designed to be found fast. To find a number in a list it needs to iterate through the whole list.

Of course the dictionary only works if your numbers are unique and not ordered.

I think there is also a HashSet<T> class in .NET 3.5, it also allows only unique elements.

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A Dictionary<Type, integer> can effectively store non-unique objects as well - use the integer to count the number of duplicates. For instance, you'd store the list {a,b,a} as {a=2,b=1}. It does lose the ordening, of course. –  MSalters May 5 '09 at 9:08

A SortedList will be faster to search (but slower to insert items)

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I think I have the answer! Yes, it's true that Contains() on a list (array) is O(n), but if the array is short and you are using value types, it still should be quite fast. But using the CLR Profiler [free download from Microsoft], I discovered that Contains() is boxing values in order to compare them, which requires heap allocation, which is VERY expensive (slow). [Note: This is .Net 2.0; other .Net versions not tested.]

Here's the full story and solution. We have an enumeration called "VI" and made a class called "ValueIdList" which is an abstract type for a list (array) of VI objects. The original implementation was in the ancient .Net 1.1 days, and it used an encapsulated ArrayList. We discovered recently in http://blogs.msdn.com/b/joshwil/archive/2004/04/13/112598.aspx that a generic list (List<VI>) performs much better than ArrayList on value types (like our enum VI) because the values don't have to be boxed. It's true and it worked... almost.

The CLR Profiler revealed a surprise. Here's a portion of the Allocation Graph:

  • ValueIdList::Contains bool(VI) 5.5MB (34.81%)
  • Generic.List::Contains bool(<UNKNOWN>) 5.5MB (34.81%)
  • Generic.ObjectEqualityComparer<T>::Equals bool (<UNKNOWN> <UNKNOWN>) 5.5MB (34.88%)
  • Values.VI 7.7MB (49.03%)

As you can see, Contains() surprisingly calls Generic.ObjectEqualityComparer.Equals(), which apparently requires the boxing of a VI value, which requires expensive heap allocation. It's odd that Microsoft would eliminate boxing on the list, only to require it again for a simple operation such as this.

Our solution was to re-write the Contains() implementation, which in our case was easy to do since we were already encapsulating the generic list object (_items). Here's the simple code:

public bool Contains(VI id) 
{
  return IndexOf(id) >= 0;
}

public int IndexOf(VI id) 
{ 
  int i, count;

  count = _items.Count;
  for (i = 0; i < count; i++)
    if (_items[i] == id)
      return i;
  return -1;
}

public bool Remove(VI id) 
{
  int i;

  i = IndexOf(id);
  if (i < 0)
    return false;
  _items.RemoveAt(i);

  return true;
}

The comparison of VI values is now being done in our own version of IndexOf() which requires no boxing, and it's very fast. Our particular program sped up by 20% after this simple re-write. O(n)... no problem! Just avoid the wasted memory usage!

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Thanks for the tip, I was being caught by bad boxing performance myself. A custom Contains implementation is way faster for my use case. –  Lea Hayes Mar 27 at 19:41

Why is a dictionary inappropriate?

To see if a particular value is in the list you need to walk the entire list. With a dictionary (or other hash based container) it's much quicker to narrow down the number of objects you need to compare against. The key (in your case, the number) is hashed and that gives the dictionary the fractional subset of objects to compare against.

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This is not exactly an answer to your question, but I have a class that increases the performance of Contains() on a collection. I subclassed a Queue and added a Dictionary that maps hashcodes to lists of objects. The Dictionary.Contains() function is O(1) whereas List.Contains(), Queue.Contains(), and Stack.Contains() are O(n).

The value-type of the dictionary is a queue holding objects with the same hashcode. The caller can supply a custom class object that implements IEqualityComparer. You could use this pattern for Stacks or Lists. The code would need just a few changes.

/// <summary>
/// This is a class that mimics a queue, except the Contains() operation is O(1) rather     than O(n) thanks to an internal dictionary.
/// The dictionary remembers the hashcodes of the items that have been enqueued and dequeued.
/// Hashcode collisions are stored in a queue to maintain FIFO order.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
private class HashQueue<T> : Queue<T>
{
    private readonly IEqualityComparer<T> _comp;
    public readonly Dictionary<int, Queue<T>> _hashes; //_hashes.Count doesn't always equal base.Count (due to collisions)

    public HashQueue(IEqualityComparer<T> comp = null) : base()
    {
        this._comp = comp;
        this._hashes = new Dictionary<int, Queue<T>>();
    }

    public HashQueue(int capacity, IEqualityComparer<T> comp = null) : base(capacity)
    {
        this._comp = comp;
        this._hashes = new Dictionary<int, Queue<T>>(capacity);
    }

    public HashQueue(IEnumerable<T> collection, IEqualityComparer<T> comp = null) :     base(collection)
    {
        this._comp = comp;

        this._hashes = new Dictionary<int, Queue<T>>(base.Count);
        foreach (var item in collection)
        {
            this.EnqueueDictionary(item);
        }
    }

    public new void Enqueue(T item)
    {
        base.Enqueue(item); //add to queue
        this.EnqueueDictionary(item);
    }

    private void EnqueueDictionary(T item)
    {
        int hash = this._comp == null ? item.GetHashCode() :     this._comp.GetHashCode(item);
        Queue<T> temp;
        if (!this._hashes.TryGetValue(hash, out temp))
        {
            temp = new Queue<T>();
            this._hashes.Add(hash, temp);
        }
        temp.Enqueue(item);
    }

    public new T Dequeue()
    {
        T result = base.Dequeue(); //remove from queue

        int hash = this._comp == null ? result.GetHashCode() : this._comp.GetHashCode(result);
        Queue<T> temp;
        if (this._hashes.TryGetValue(hash, out temp))
        {
            temp.Dequeue();
            if (temp.Count == 0)
                this._hashes.Remove(hash);
        }

        return result;
    }

    public new bool Contains(T item)
    { //This is O(1), whereas Queue.Contains is (n)
        int hash = this._comp == null ? item.GetHashCode() : this._comp.GetHashCode(item);
        return this._hashes.ContainsKey(hash);
    }

    public new void Clear()
    {
        foreach (var item in this._hashes.Values)
            item.Clear(); //clear collision lists

        this._hashes.Clear(); //clear dictionary

        base.Clear(); //clear queue
    }
}

My simple testing shows that my HashQueue.Contains() runs much faster than Queue.Contains(). Running the test code with count set to 10,000 takes 0.00045 seconds for the HashQueue version and 0.37 seconds for the Queue version. With a count of 100,000, the HashQueue version takes 0.0031 seconds whereas the Queue takes 36.38 seconds!

Here's my testing code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int count = 10000;

    { //HashQueue
        var q = new HashQueue<int>(count);

        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) //load queue (not timed)
            q.Enqueue(i);

        System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch sw = System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            bool contains = q.Contains(i);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("HashQueue, {0}", sw.Elapsed));
    }

    { //Queue
        var q = new Queue<int>(count);

        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) //load queue (not timed)
            q.Enqueue(i);

        System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch sw = System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            bool contains = q.Contains(i);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Queue,     {0}", sw.Elapsed));
    }

    Console.ReadLine();
}
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I'm using this in the Compact Framework where there is no support for HashSet, I have opted for a Dictionary where both strings are the value I am looking for.

It means I get list<> functionality with dictionary performance. It's a bit hacky, but it works.

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If you're using a Dictionary in lieu of a HashSet, you might as well set the value to "" rather than the same string as the key. That way you will use less memory. Alternatively you could even use Dictionary<string,bool> and set them all to true (or false). I don't know which would use less memory, an empty string or a bool. My guess would be bool. –  TTT Jun 13 '12 at 18:32
    
In the dictionary, a string reference and a bool value make a difference of 3 or 7 bytes, for 32 or 64 bit systems respectively. Note, however, that the size of each entry is rounded up to multiples of 4 or 8, respectively. The choice between string and bool might thus not make any difference in the size at all. The empty string "" does always exist in memory already as the static property string.Empty, so it doesn't make any difference whether you use it in the dictionary or not. (And it is used elsewhere anyway.) –  Wormbo Aug 4 '12 at 13:52

This is what I was looking for, a Hashset. Dictionary may not be a good choice in my case as I dont have any values to fill and I was thinking that if I use dictionary I would be wasting some memory by filling the dictionary with some default values for all the values.

I am not sure though (dint get much information from http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb359438.aspx on Hashset Internals) on how the Hashset is implemented. Some stackoverflow wisdom here?

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