Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a programming contest, a problem was:

Count all solutions to the equation: x + 4y + 4z = n. You will be given n and you will determine the count of solutions. Assume x, y and z are positive integers.

I have considered using triple for loops (brute force), but it was unefficient, causing TIME LIMIT EXCEED. (since the n may be = 1000,000):

int sol = 0;
for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++)
{
 for (int j = 1; j <= n / 4; j++)
 {
  for (int k = 1; k <= n / 4; k++)
   {
      if (i + 4 * j + 4 * k == n)
         sol++;
   }
 }
}

My friend could solve the problem. When I asked him, he said that he didn't use brute force at all. Instead, he converted the equation to a 'series' (i.e. summition). I asked him to tell how me but he refused :)

Can I know how?

share|improve this question
2  
x, y and z often denote real numbers. Are they assumed to be integers here? Positive? Or also negative numbers? –  thiton Nov 23 '11 at 8:12
1  
Potentially useful: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  sarnold Nov 23 '11 at 8:12
1  
This equation defines a plane in R3, which contains an infinite number of integer solutions. You can't bruteforce an infinite set ;) –  Blender Nov 23 '11 at 8:13
2  
Most likely the missing constraint is that x, y and z are non-negative integers. –  Alexey Frunze Nov 23 '11 at 8:15
    
If that's the case (x, y, z are non-negative integers), could you use generating functions to solve this? –  David Hu Nov 23 '11 at 8:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is particular case of coin change problem, which is solved in general by dynamic programming.

But here we can elaborate simple solution. I consider x,y,z > 0

x + 4*(y+z)=n Let y + z = q = p + 1 (q > 1, p > 0)

x+4*q=n

x+4*p=n-4

There are M = Floor((n-5)/4) variants for x and p, hence there are M possible values of q = 2..M+1 For every q>1 there are (q-1) variants of y and z: q = 1 + (q-1) = 2 + (q-2) +..+(q-1)+1

So we have N=1 + 2 + 3 + ... + M = M * (M + 1)/2 solutions

Example:

n = 15;

M = (15 - 5) div 4 = 2

N = 3

(3,1,2),(3,2,1),(7,1,1)

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry. I don't get it –  Desolator Dec 14 '11 at 8:05
    
What step is unclear? –  MBo Dec 14 '11 at 13:06

First note that n-x must be divisible by 4. Start by finding the smallest value that x can take:

start = 4
while ((n - start) % 4 != 0)
{
    start = start + 1
}

From now on, you know that x will take values from [start, start+4, start+8 ...]. Now you can count the number of solutions by a simple counting loop:

count = 0

for (x = start; x < n - 4; x = x + 4)
{
    y_z_sum = (n - x) / 4
    count = count + y_z_sum - 1
}

For each choice of x, we can compute the value of y+z. For each value for y+z, there are y+z-1 possible choices (since y ranges from 1 to y+z-1, assuming that y and z are both positive integers).

Instead of a brute force solution with O(n3) running time, you can achieve O(n) this way.

share|improve this answer
    
When tested with n = 40, Brute Force = 36 while this solution gives 45 ?? –  Desolator Nov 23 '11 at 12:03
    
Why are your loops' tests are <= n/4? You are missing some solutions because your range is too small. –  loudandclear Nov 24 '11 at 0:40
    
I am checking n/4 because the equation indicates that 4y = n. So, y can not be larger than n/4. The same is with z. –  Desolator Nov 30 '11 at 7:52
    
Right. Change the initial start value to 4 and it should work fine (edited the answer accordingly). –  loudandclear Nov 30 '11 at 9:08
    
sorry. Still doesn't work. What if n % 4 != 0? for example: n = 432. Brute force = 5671 = this solution. When n = 479: Brute force = 5671, this solution = 5565. –  Desolator Dec 14 '11 at 8:02

This is a classic linear algebra problem. Please refer to any linear algebra textbook on how to solve a system of linear equations. One such method is called Gaussian Elimination.

share|improve this answer
    
@Down-voter: can you please give the reason as to why you have given a down vote? –  yasouser Nov 23 '11 at 18:55
3  
Wasn't me, but Gaussian Elimination is useless here. The "system of equations" is just one equation. –  Tom Sirgedas Nov 23 '11 at 19:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.