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On iOS device, I recently found that a strange behavior.

Code1:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{
        NSLog(@"1111");
    });
    while (1) {
        sleep(1);
    }
});

Code2:

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{
        NSLog(@"1111");
    });
    while (1) {
        sleep(0.5);
    }
});

Code1 and Code2's only difference is that Code1 sleep 1second every loop and Code2 sleep 0.5.

If you run these two code on iOS device with single core, Code1 will print out the @"1111", but Code2 won't.

I don't why, the global queue is assumed to be concurrent.It should always print out the number no matter what other blocks are doing. And if it is something due to that single core device's limit, why sleep(0.5) and sleep(1) would make the difference?

I really want to know the reason for this.

EDIT I found use sleep(0.5) is my stupid mistake. sleep() function take an unsigned int parameter.So sleep(0.5) is equal to sleep(0). But do sleep(0) will block the whole concurrent queue?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The reason is that your second sleep() is essentially a sleep(0) which means that you're now buzz-looping the thread that GCD gave to you, and that's probably the same thread that would have executed the nested dispatch_async() if you had given it a chance to do anything else, which the first example does. During the one second sleep, GCD sees that the thread is blocked and creates a new one to service the outstanding queued request(s). In the second example, you're essentially computationally starving the enqueued work - GCD is not smart enough to know that a thread has been locked into an infinite loop, and you're not giving the system enough work to justify (in GCD's eyes) the creation of another thread, so... You've essentially discovered a bug in GCD's low-threshold of work logic, I think.

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Your answer's correct, but it's not a bug, it's just GCD being efficient by letting the single-core CPU finish the current task before giving it another of equal priority. Matching the number of busy threads to the number of available cores is a fundamental part of what GCD was designed to do. –  sup Dec 14 '12 at 7:49
    
Well this is odd. I decided to test to see if GCD will suspend a low-priority block when you dispatch new blocks to the high-priority queue. What actually happens is, not only does it not suspend the low-priority blocks, it will actually start new low-priority blocks even while two high-priority blocks are still running (this is on a dual-core A5). It will bizarrely decide to run up to six blocks concurrently, seemingly with no regard to the priority of the global queues they were dispatched on. This would seem to indicate a serious bug with iOS GCD. –  sup Dec 14 '12 at 8:42
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Just checked out, 1st and 2nd snippets print "1111". Note, nesting of dispatch_async you use won't give any profit, because you set the same priorities (DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT) all the tasks "NSLog(@"1111");"

and "

while (1) {
        sleep(0.5);

"

will be added to the same target queue. As the result I can assume that in the first case block with WHILE will be executed first, and because it will not finish never, the next task in the queue(NSLog(...)) will be never called.

You can try to use different priorities for the queues (DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_LOW f.e.).

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what dispatch_get_global_queue() function return is global queue(concurrent queue). so dispatch several block to the same concurrent queue should be OK.while loop block should not prevent the nslog block to execute –  Jimmy Nov 24 '11 at 2:11
    
If you use the same priority, the global queue will be the same –  d.lebedev Nov 24 '11 at 8:25
    
I know the queue will be the same.But global queue is concurrent.Dispatched blocks to concurrent GCD queue is supposed to be excuted concurrent or at least do not disturb each other. –  Jimmy Nov 25 '11 at 9:30
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