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I would like to know what are mark() and reset() methods in BufferedReader.I read the javadoc but as i am a beginer I was unable to understand it.

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What specifically do you not understand? How can anyone explain it to you, given that you already do not understand one explanation (in the JavaDoc), and we do not know what you didi not understand in the first explanation. –  Raedwald Jul 24 at 6:58

5 Answers 5

The mark() marking a particular point in a stream and reset() resets the stream to the most recent mark. These methods provide a book-marking feature that allows you to read ahead in the stream to inspect the upcoming data.

From this documentation:

The mark() method mark a position in the input to which the stream can be "reset" by calling the reset() method. The parameter readLimit is the number of chars that can be read from the stream after setting the mark before the mark becomes invalid. For example, if mark() is called with a read limit of 10, then when 11 chars of data are read from the stream before the reset() method is called, then the mark is invalid and the stream object instance is not required to remember the mark. Note that the number of chars that can be remembered by this method can be greater than the size of the internal read buffer. It is also not dependent on the subordinate stream supporting mark/reset functionality.

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Streams can't naturally be "unread" to go backwards. Mark/reset provides a way to emulate that if needed.

Once you call mark() it will begin remembering data you read from that point forwards in memory. When you call reset() it will jump back to the marked position, by satisfying future read()s from the in the in-memory buffer. If you read past the end of that buffer, then it will seamlessly go back to reading fresh data from the underlying "in" reader that the BufferedReader was created with.

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Imagine you have the following chars in the the BufferReader = "123456789", if you mark in the position 4 relative to the '5' char then reset your BufferReader you will end up with 12345.

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This is half the answer, and what is reset? –  eeerahul Nov 23 '11 at 10:21
    
Hey gave a proper answer. Reset just brings the pointer, which is pointing at the character to be read, to the position it has been marked at. –  Umang Desai Oct 16 '13 at 12:39

Example:

import java.io.*;
import static java.lang.System.out;

public class App {

    public static final String LINE = "Line 1\nLine 2\nLine 3\nLine 4\n";

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        try (BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new StringReader(LINE))) {

            out.println(in.readLine());
            in.mark(0);                 // mark 'Line 2'
            out.println(in.readLine());
            out.println(in.readLine());
            in.reset();                 // reset 'Line 2'
            out.println(in.readLine());
            in.reset();                 // reset 'Line 2'
            out.println(in.readLine());
            in.mark(0);                 // mark 'Line 3'
            out.println(in.readLine());
            in.reset();                 // reset 'Line 3'
            out.println(in.readLine());
            out.println(in.readLine());

        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Output:

Line 1
Line 2
Line 3
Line 2
Line 2
Line 3
Line 3
Line 4
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How can you call reset()? I thought that if you mark() with a read limit of 0, as soon as one character is read the marker becomes invalid and it is impossible to call reset. Can you explain your answer? –  snooze92 Feb 24 at 14:37
    
@snooze92 Just to run this example and try to change markLimit argument in mark method. You will have the same result all time. Also see the similar examples: 1, 2. I actually wanted to make questions on SO that someone gave me an explanation about it. –  Dozortsev Anton Feb 24 at 17:25
1  
After running more examples of my own, I understand the mark(readAheadLimit)/reset() mechanism a little bit better. Basically, the mark method simply marks a point in the current buffer, and reset lets you go back to that marked point. The thing is, it is not meant to mark a point in a file or stream, as it needs to increase the buffer size to keep the possibility to access the marked point. That is why one should use a limit that relatively smaller than the buffer size. –  snooze92 Feb 25 at 9:12
2  
As of "why does the example work with a limit of 0 (or any limit actually)" is also quite easy to explain. The default buffer size (used in both examples) is 4096. The String used for the examples is so small that it is entirely read in the first buffer as soon as the BufferedReader is created. It does not read anything more later, therefore the limit parameter is not used at all... making the example quite pointless and confusing IMHO. Changing the examples slightly to add a very small buffer size (e.g. 2 or 3) in the BufferedReader constructors will start throwing invalid mark exceptions. –  snooze92 Feb 25 at 9:18
    
@snooze92 Thanks for explanation. Upvoted your comments. –  Dozortsev Anton Feb 25 at 14:18

Reader interface does not let you return, you can just read. BufferedReader, on the other hand, creates a buffer, so you are able to return a bit when reading. And this is what those methods are for.

With mark() method you put a "marker" to a position, then you can read on. Once you realize you want to return the the marked position you use reset() for that. And from that point you read again the same values. You can use it for anything you want.

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