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In my code in need to use a IEnumerable<> several times thus get the Resharper error of "Possible multiple enumeration of IEnumerable".

Sample code:

public List<object> Foo(IEnumerable<object> objects)
{
    if (objects == null || !objects.Any())
        throw new ArgumentException();

    var firstObject = objects.First();
    var list = DoSomeThing(firstObject);        
    var secondList = DoSomeThingElse(objects);
    list.AddRange(secondList);

    return list;
}
  • I can change the the objects parameter to be List and then avoid the possible multiple enumeration but then I don't get the highest object that I can handle.
  • Another thing that I can do is to is to convert the IEnumerable to List in the beginning of the method:

 public List<object> Foo(IEnumerable<object> objects)
 {
    var objectList = objects.ToList();
    // ...
 }

But this is just awkward.

What would you do in this scenario?

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4 Answers

up vote 93 down vote accepted

The problem with taking IEnumerable as a parameter is that it tells callers "I wish to enumerate this". It doesn't tell them how many times you wish to enumerate.

I can change the the objects parameter to be List and then avoid the possible multiple enumeration but then I don't get the highest object that I can handle.

The goal of taking the highest object is noble, but it leaves room for too many assumptions. Do you really want someone to pass a LINQ to SQL query to this method, only for you to enumerate it twice (getting potentially different results each time?)

The semantic missing here is that a caller, who perhaps doesn't take time to read the details of the method, may assume you only iterate once - so they pass you an expensive object. Your method signature doesn't indicate either way.

By changing the method signature to IList/ICollection, you will at least make it clearer to the caller what your expectations are, and they can avoid costly mistakes.

Otherwise, most developers looking at the method might assume you only iterate once. If taking an IEnumerable is so important, you should consider doing the .ToList() at the start of the method.

It's a shame .NET doesn't have an interface that is IEnumerable + Count + indexer, without Add/Remove etc. methods, which is what I suspect would solve this problem.

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2  
+1 for the lack of "reade list" in .net –  vidstige Nov 23 '11 at 12:26
9  
Does ReadOnlyCollection<T> meet your desired interface requirements? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms132474.aspx –  Dan Neely Dec 12 '12 at 19:46
2  
@DanNeely I would suggest IReadOnlyCollection(T) (new with .net 4.5) as the best interface to convey the idea that it is an IEnumerable(T) which is intended to be enumerated multiple times. As this answer states, IEnumerable(T) itself is so generic that it may even refer to un-resetable content which cannot be enumerated over again without side effects. But IReadOnlyCollection(T) implies re-iterability. –  binki Nov 11 '13 at 17:21
    
@DanNeely, Thanks, you are right ! –  Eric Ouellet Dec 9 '13 at 13:59
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If your data is always going to be repeatable, perhaps don't worry about it. However, you can unroll it too - this is especially useful if the incoming data could be large (for example, reading from disk/network):

if(objects == null) throw new ArgumentException();
using(var iter = objects.GetEnumerator()) {
    if(!iter.MoveNext()) throw new ArgumentException();

    var firstObject = iter.Current;
    var list = DoSomeThing(firstObject);  

    while(iter.MoveNext()) {
        list.Add(DoSomeThingElse(iter.Current));
    }
    return list;
}

Note I changed the semantic of DoSomethingElse a bit, but this is mainly to show unrolled usage. You could re-wrap the iterator, for example. You could make it an iterator block too, which could be nice; then there is no list - and you would yield return the items as you get them, rather than add to a list to be returned.

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1  
+1 Well that is a very nice code, but- I loose the prettiness and readability of the code. –  gdoron Nov 23 '11 at 10:58
1  
@gdoron not everything is pretty ;p I don't the the above is unreadable, though. Especially if it is made into an iterator block - quite cute, IMO. –  Marc Gravell Nov 23 '11 at 11:01
    
I can just write: "var objectList = objects.ToList();" and save all the Enumerator handling. –  gdoron Nov 23 '11 at 11:39
1  
@gdoron in the question you explicitly said you didn't really want to do that ;p Also, a ToList() approach may not suit if the data if very large (potentially, infinite - sequences do not need to be finite, but can still be iterated). Ultimately, I'm just presenting an option. Only you know the full context to see if it is warranted. If your data is repeatable, another valid option is: don't change anything! Ignore R# instead... it all depends on the context. –  Marc Gravell Nov 23 '11 at 11:47
    
I think Marc's solution is quite nice. 1. It is very clear how the 'list' is initialized, it is very clear how the list is iterated, and it is very clear which members of the list are operated on. –  Keith Hoffman Jun 4 '12 at 16:59
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If the aim is really to prevent multiple enumerations than the answer by Marc Gravell is the one to read, but maintaining the same semantics you could simple remove the redundant Any and First calls and go with:

public List<object> Foo(IEnumerable<object> objects)
{
    if (objects == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("objects");

    var first = objects.FirstOrDefault();

    if (first == null)
        throw new ArgumentException(
            "Empty enumerable not supported.", 
            "objects");

    var list = DoSomeThing(first);  

    var secondList = DoSomeThingElse(objects);

    list.AddRange(secondList);

    return list;
}

Note, that this assumes that you IEnumerable is not generic or at least is constrained to be a reference type.

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+1 for descriptive message in the exception. –  vidstige Nov 23 '11 at 11:03
1  
objects is still being passed to DoSomethingElse which is returning a list, so the possibility that you are still enumerating twice is still there. Either way if the collection was a LINQ to SQL query, you hit the DB twice. –  Paul Stovell Nov 23 '11 at 11:04
    
My code isn't a "real code" only a sample. –  gdoron Nov 23 '11 at 11:04
1  
@PaulStovell, Read this: "If the aim is really to prevent multiple enumerations than the answer by Marc Gravell is the one to read" =) –  gdoron Nov 23 '11 at 11:06
    
It has been suggested on some other stackoverflow posts on throwing exceptions for empty lists and I'll suggest it here: why throw an exception on an empty list? Get an empty list, give an empty list. As a paradigm, that's pretty straightforward. If the caller doesn't know they are passing an empty list in, that's there problem. –  Keith Hoffman Jun 4 '12 at 17:02
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First off, that warning does not always mean so much. I usually turn it off. It just means the IEnumerable is evaluated twice, wich is usually not a problem unless the evaluation itself takes a long time. Even if it does take a long time, in this case your only using one element the first time around.

In this scenario you could also exploit the powerful linq extension methods even more.

var firstObject = objects.First();
return DoSomeThing(firstObject).Concat(DoSomeThingElse(objects).ToList();

It is possible to only evaluate the IEnumerable once in this case with some hassle, but profile first and see if it's really a problem.

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3  
I work a lot with IQueryable and turning those kind of warnings off is very dangerous. –  gdoron Nov 23 '11 at 11:01
2  
Evaluating twice is a bad thing in my books. If the method takes IEnumerable, I may be tempted to pass a LINQ to SQL query to it, which results in multiple DB calls. Since the method signature doesn't indicate that it may enumerate twice, it should either change the signature (accept IList/ICollection) or only iterate once –  Paul Stovell Nov 23 '11 at 11:01
2  
optimizing early and ruining readability and thereby the possibility to do optimizations that make a diffrence later is way worse in my book. –  vidstige Nov 23 '11 at 12:26
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