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I need to check if each element in second list has 3 times more instances then the same element in the first list. My function returns false all the time and I don't know what I'm dong wrong.

Here is the code:

fourth(_,[ ]).
fourth(A,[HF|TF]) :-
    intersection(A, HF, NewA),
    intersection(TF, HF, NewB),
    append(HF, NewB, NewT),
    append(NewA, NewA, NewAA),
    append(NewA, NewAA, NewAAA),
    length(NewAAA) == length(NewT),
    select(HF, TF, NewTF),
    fourth(A, NewTF).

Example:

fourth([1,2,3], [1,1,1]).
true

fourth([1,2,3], [1,1,1,1]).
false

fourth([1,2,3], [1,1]).
false

fourth([1,2,2,3], [1,1,2,2,1,2,2,2,2]).
true
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would make myself a select/3 predicate: select(X,From,Left), and then for each elt of a first list I'd call it three times with same first argument on a second list, progressively passing it forward, getting me a final Left3 without the three occurences of X; iand I'd do that for each elt of a first list. Then if I'd succeed and end up with an empty list, that means it had exactly three times each elt from the first list.

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1  
Note that if you use SWI-pl's select/3, it'd fail for fourth([1,2,3], [1,1,1]). while it shouldn't if you respect OP specification. Use of member/2 before the use of select/3 to know whether or not the current first list element is in the second list should handle the problem though. –  m09 Nov 23 '11 at 12:59

Your code seems needlessly complicated. It also contains bugs where you use HF instead of the list [HF].

So what's the logic you want to implement?:

  1. take the next element from the second list (leaving the tail)
  2. check if it's in the first list, and if it is, remove it (else fail)
  3. remove it two more times from the tail of the second list

and this gives:

fourth(_,[ ]).
fourth(A,[HF|TF]) :-
     once(select(HF, A, AR)), % using once/1 to avoid choicepoints
     once(select(HF, TF, TF1)),
     once(select(HF, TF1, TFR)),
     fourth(AR, TFR).
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2  
It's homework, maybe explicit code isn't welcome. And your answer follows what's already suggested by Will Ness. –  CapelliC Nov 23 '11 at 12:27
    
Point taken. Though I always felt I learned more and faster from analyzing good solutions than struggling to come up with a mediocre one. Don't know how it's done these days, but I would ask for a thorough explanation of the reasoning, so just copying the code won't cut it. –  twinterer Nov 23 '11 at 12:49

Here is your code with suggestions on why it fails :

fourth(_,[]).
fourth(A,[HF|TF]) :-
    intersection(A, HF, NewA),
    intersection(TF, HF, NewB),

It's not intersection/3 that you want to use, for two reasons :

1) it doesn't filter only HF in A.

2) it fails if you call it with an element, so at least use [HF] instead of HF

Instead, use include/3 : include(=(HF), A, NewA). See SWI-pl doc for more info.

    append(HF, NewB, NewT),
    append(NewA, NewA, NewAA),
    append(NewA, NewAA, NewAAA),

Use of append/2 is better, especially for your NewAAA list.

    length(NewAAA) == length(NewT),

You can't compare lengths like that. First, length/1 doesn't exist in built-in swi-pl predicates. Instead, compare directly the lists or use length/2 twice and then compare the results.

    select(HF, TF, NewTF),
    fourth(A, NewTF).

Only removing once HT in TF will cause your algorithm to fail. You need to remove all the occurrences of HT in TF, with subtract/3 for example...

If you want a working solution respecting your original work, I'll add it, so feel free to ask, but as it was tagged homework I'll let you those working leads first...

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