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The default constructor in a generated Entity Framework Entities file is like this:

public ProjectEntities() : base("name=ProjectEntities", "ProjectEntities")
{
    this.OnContextCreated();
}

I want to change it to:

public ProjectEntities() : base(UtilClass.GetEnvDependantConnectionStringName(), "ProjectEntities")
{
    this.OnContextCreated();
}

This is because I want to have a different connection string for all the dev environments and the production environment, and have no chance they are mixed up (which is what my custom method checks).

How do I do that? This code is thrown away every time the designer file is regenerated.

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2 Answers 2

You need to create another file alongside the auto-created ProjectEntities.Designer.cs, say ProjectEntities.cs. In that you use partial to extend the functionality of your entities class like this:

public partial class ProjectEntities : ObjectContext
{
  partial void OnContextCreated()
  {
    this.Connection.ConnectionString = UtilClass.GetEnvDependantConnectionString();
  }
}

The file won't then get changed when you regenerate the .Designer.cs file. You'll have to fetch the connection string yourself...

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This works, except that when you also use the constructor(string connectionstring), you will always reset your connection string in OnContextCreated. I answered my question, with the solution we ended up using. –  Halfgaar Nov 23 '11 at 12:42
up vote 0 down vote accepted

We fixed it by calling our entities ProjectEntitiesPrivate, and what was partial class ProjectEntities before, is now a non partial class ProjectEntities : ProjectEntitiesPrivate, with the constructor I need:

public class ProjectEntities: ProjectEntitiesPrivate
{
    public ProjectEntities():base(UtilClass.GetEnvDependantConnectionStringName())
    {

    }

....
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Yes, but how will that stop a programmer from mistakenly calling the base constructor? –  40-Love Jan 6 '12 at 13:53
    
You can't, but the name 'private' should be a hint :). Plus I added a comment. Since I also want to be able to call the constructor with the connection string, the solution proposed by James won't work. –  Halfgaar Jan 13 '12 at 11:05
    
Thanks, I was having the same problem, and I ended up modifying the constructor code in the template file (Model.context.tt), which was pretty easy to do. –  40-Love Jan 13 '12 at 14:32

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