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What is a callback function?

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13 Answers

Many are confused by what a callback is because of the name of the damned thing.

A callback method is one which is passed as an argument from another method which is invoked due to some kind of event. The 'call back' nature of the argument is that it returns its result to the method that provided it as an argument - that is to say that it 'calls back' with the return value of the callback method.

//An innocuous looking method which will become known as a callback method
//because of the way in which we will invoke it.
int meaningOfLife() {
    return 42;
}


//An innocuous looking method which just takes an int and prints it to screen
void printANumber(int a_Number) {
    System.out.print(a_Number);
}

//invoking a method which passes another method as an argument in reaction to an event  (the 'another' method - meaningOfLife - is therefore called a callback method) and the event - main() - is that the program is starting
void main() {
    printANumber(meaningOfLife());
}

Callbacks are so-called due to their usage with pointer languages. If you don't use one of those, don't labour over the name 'callback'. Just understand that it is just a name to describe a method that's supplied as an argument to another method, such that when that method is called (whatever condition, such as a button click, a timer tick etc) the callback method is therefore invoked, which returns a result to the calling method, which in turn returns a result to the event.

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Should not the Print_A_Number(meaningOfLife); be Print_A_Number(meaningOfLife()); instead? Thanks. –  Kraken Mar 13 '13 at 16:33
    
@Kraken - yes well spotted. Added! –  7SpecialGems Mar 14 '13 at 14:36
2  
Your example is great but I don't see why the terminology is "callback". When is meaningOfLife "called back"? –  Imray Apr 11 '13 at 14:51
2  
The value returned from meaningOfLife(), 42, is provided straight away as an argument of printANumber(). Calling a method as an argument, and the result of that method returning its value, is "calling back" if it is then providing that value an argument for something else. Think of printANumber saying, "Hey, meaningOfLife, what's your value? I need it for something" and meaningOfLife calling (shouting) back, "Hey, it's 42!". –  7SpecialGems Apr 11 '13 at 16:09
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callback is because of the name of the damned thing - cannot agree with you more. –  JavaDeveloper Oct 28 '13 at 5:40
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Note that callback is one word.

The wikipedia callback page explains it very well.

quote from wikipedia page:

In computer programming, a callback is a reference to executable code, or a piece of executable code, that is passed as an argument to other code. This allows a lower-level software layer to call a subroutine (or function) defined in a higher-level layer.

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Nice way to present an answer. –  Chathuranga Chandrasekara May 5 '09 at 10:24
1  
And this also leads to the answer in a different way. The noun "callback" is that which has been "called back", in the same way something that's gone through shutdown has been shut down and something that's used to log in is a login. –  Anonymous May 5 '09 at 10:43
7  
This could have been a comment - basically it's a link to Wikipedia –  Imray Apr 11 '13 at 14:37
2  
I don't rate this answer at all.. –  adaam Mar 7 at 13:37
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A callback function is one that should be called when a certain condition is met. Instead of being called immediately, the callback function is called at a certain point in the future.

Typically it is used when a task is being started that will finish asynchronously (ie will finish some time after the calling function has returned).

For example, a function to request a webpage might require its caller to provide a callback function that will be called when the webpage has finished downloading.

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I believe this "callback" jargon has been mistakenly used in a lot of places. My definition would be something like:

A callback function is a function that you pass to someone and let them call it at some point of time.

I think people just read the first sentence of the wiki definition:

a callback is a reference to executable code, or a piece of executable code, that is passed as an argument to other code.

I've been working with lots of APIs, see various of bad examples. Many people tend to name a function pointer (a reference to executable code) or anonymous functions(a piece of executable code) "callback", if they are just functions why do you need another name for this?

Actually only the second sentence in wiki definition reveals the differences between a callback function and a normal function:

This allows a lower-level software layer to call a subroutine (or function) defined in a higher-level layer.

so the difference is who you are going to pass the function and how your passed in function is going to be called. If you just define a function and pass it to another function and called it directly in that function body, don't call it a callback. The definition says your passed in function is gonna be called by "lower-level" function.

I hope people can stop using this word in ambiguous context, it can't help people to understand better only worse.

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Your answer makes sense... but I'm having trouble picturing it. Can you give an example? –  Imray Apr 11 '13 at 14:56
    
@Zane Wong :: In the last you have written "The definition says your passed in function is gonna be called by "lower-level" function." Can you please explain what lower-level function indicates ? Its better if you give an example . –  jensar Jan 23 at 14:44
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A layman response would be that it is a function that is not called by you but rather by the user or by the browser after a certain event has happened or after some code has been processed.

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+1 for "layman response" –  CyprUS Apr 18 '12 at 7:36
    
cool enof :) good one –  JavaDeveloper Oct 28 '13 at 5:42
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A callback function is a function you specify to an existing function/method, to be invoked when an action is completed, requires additional processing, etc.

In Javascript, or more specifically jQuery, for example, you can specify a callback argument to be called when an animation has finished.

In PHP, the preg_replace_callback() function allows you to provide a function that will be called when the regular expression is matched, passing the string(s) matched as arguments.

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This makes callbacks sound like return statements at the end of methods.

I'm not sure that's what they are.

I think Callbacks are actually a call to a function, as a consequence of another function being invoked and completing.

I also think Callbacks are meant to address the originating invocation, in a kind of "hey! that thing you asked for? I've done it - just thought I would let you know - back over to you".

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+1 for questioning Callbacks vs Return statements. I used to get caught out by this and so do many graduates who I work with. –  7SpecialGems Sep 26 '11 at 0:38
    
Good answer - helped me understand it unlike many of the other answers! –  adaam Mar 7 at 13:38
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Callbacks are most easily described in terms of the telephone system. A function call is analogous to calling someone on a telephone, asking her a question, getting an answer, and hanging up; adding a callback changes the analogy so that after asking her a question, you also give her your name and number so she can call you back with the answer. -- Paul Jakubik , "Callback Implementations in C++"

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The simple answer to this question is that a callback function is a function that is called through a function pointer. If you pass the pointer (address) of a function as an argument to another, when that pointer is used to call the function it points to it is said that a call back is made

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look at the image :)this is how it works

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Would you mind also adding a text explanation to this? If the image vanishes, this answer loses all context. –  Tim Post Dec 23 '11 at 7:34
    
text from other people explains it the best. the only thing i felt is lacking is the image :) –  jeet.mg Dec 23 '11 at 8:46
4  
Mirror: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Callback-notitle.svg –  XP1 Feb 1 '12 at 5:16
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Assume we have a function sort(int *arraytobesorted,void (*algorithmchosen)(void)) where it can accept a function pointer as its argument which can be used at some point in sort()'s implementation . Then , here the code that is being addressed by the function pointer algorithmchosen is called as callback function .

And see the advantage is that we can choose any algorithm like:

  1.    algorithmchosen = bubblesort
  2.    algorithmchosen = heapsort
  3.    algorithmchosen = mergesort   ...

Which were, say,have been implemented with the prototype:

  1.   `void bubblesort(void)`
  2.   `void heapsort(void)`
  3.   `void mergesort(void)`   ...

This is a concept used in achieving Polymorphism in Object Oriented Programming

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Call After would be a better name than the stupid name, callback. When or if condition gets met within a function, call another function, the Call After function, the one received as argument.

Rather than hard-code an inner function within a function, one writes a function to accept an already-written Call After function as argument. The Call After might get called based on state changes detected by code in the function receiving the argument.

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This concept wasn't taught me in school, but when I started working I saw its being used at quite frequently at many places.
One important usage area is that you register one of your function as a handle (i.e. a callback) and then send a message / call some function to do some work or processing. Now after the processing is done, the called function would call our registered function (i.e. now call back is done), thus indicating us processing is done.
This wikipedia link explains quite well graphically.

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