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I'm attempting to use the ReaderWriterLockSlim class to manage a list.

There are many reads to this list and few writes, my reads are fast whereas my writes are slow.

I have a simple test harness written to check how the lock works.

If the following situation occurs

Thread 1 - Start Write
Thread 2 - Start Read
Thread 3 - Start Write

Then the outcome is as follows

Thread 1 starts its write and locks the list.
Thread 2 adds itself to the read queue.
Thread 3 adds itself to the write queue.
Thread 1 finishes writing and releases the lock
Thread 3 aquires the lock and starts its write
Thread 3 finishes writing and releases the lock
Thread 2 performs its read

Is there any way of changing the behaviour of the lock so that any Read requests that were queued before a write lock are allowed to complete before the write locks are granted?

EDIT: The code that demonstrates the issue I have is below

public partial class SimpleLock : System.Web.UI.Page
{
    public static ReaderWriterLockSlim threadLock = new ReaderWriterLockSlim();

    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        List<String> outputList = new List<String>();

        Thread thread1 = new Thread(
            delegate(object output)
            {
                ((List<String>)output).Add("Write 1 Enter");
                threadLock.EnterWriteLock();
                ((List<String>)output).Add("Write 1 Begin");
                Thread.Sleep(100);
                ((List<String>)output).Add("Write 1 End");
                threadLock.ExitWriteLock();
                ((List<String>)output).Add("Write 1 Exit");
            }
        );
        thread1.Start(outputList);

        Thread.Sleep(10);

        Thread thread2 = new Thread(
            delegate(object output)
            {
                ((List<String>)output).Add("Read 2 Enter");
                threadLock.EnterReadLock();
                ((List<String>)output).Add("Read 2 Begin");
                Thread.Sleep(100);
                ((List<String>)output).Add("Read 2 End");
                threadLock.ExitReadLock();
                ((List<String>)output).Add("Read 2 Exit");
            }
        );
        thread2.Start(outputList);

        Thread.Sleep(10);

        Thread thread3 = new Thread(
            delegate(object output)
            {
                ((List<String>)output).Add("Write 3 Enter");
                threadLock.EnterWriteLock();
                ((List<String>)output).Add("Write 3 Begin");
                Thread.Sleep(100);
                ((List<String>)output).Add("Write 3 End");
                threadLock.ExitWriteLock();
                ((List<String>)output).Add("Write 3 Exit");
            }
        );
        thread3.Start(outputList);

        thread1.Join();
        thread2.Join();
        thread3.Join();

        Response.Write(String.Join("<br />", outputList.ToArray()));
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
The direct answer to your question, "Is there any way of changing the behavior of the lock," the answer is no. Documentation for ReaderWriterLockSlim says, "A thread that tries to enter read mode blocks if there are threads waiting to enter write mode or if there is a single thread in write mode." There is not currently a way to change that behavior. –  Jim Mischel Sep 12 '13 at 21:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is there any way of changing the behaviour of the lock so that any Read requests that were queued before a write lock are allowed to complete before the write locks are granted?

What about avoiding the use of locks almost entirely? During a write you can acquire a lock, copy the original data structure, modify the copy, and then publish the new data structure by swapping out the old reference with the new reference. Since you never modify the data structure after it has been "published" then you would not need to lock reads at all.

Here is how it works:

public class Example
{
  private object writelock = new object();
  private volatile List<string> data = new List<string>();

  public void Write(string item)
  {
    lock (writelock)
    {
      var copy = new List<string>(data); // Create the copy.
      copy.Add(item); // Modify the data structure.
      data = copy; // Publish the modified data structure.
    }
  }

  public string Read(int index)
  {
    return data[index];
  }
}

The trick we are exploiting here is the immutability of whatever is reference by the data variable. The only thing we need to do is to mark the variable as volatile.

Note that this trick only works if the writes are sufficiently infrequent enough and the data structure is small enough to keep the copy operation cheap. It is not the be all end all solution. It is not ideal for every scenario, but it may just work for you.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the method we have gone for. It actually has a HUGE overhead as the size of the "list" is big. It takes a long time to make a copy. However, at the moment it seems to be holding up. –  Robin Day Nov 24 '11 at 9:12
1  
To add to this, in your example, during the Write you create a third version of the list which you then replace snapshot with. In reality, you can just maintain the "master" list which all reads are done from as well. Then a Write can "lock" the master so that no further writes can occur. Its first step is to make a copy of the master. It then Updates the copy as required, then replaces "master" with the copy. –  Robin Day Nov 24 '11 at 9:29
    
@RobinDay: Yes, excellent catch! I had not thought about that. That reduces the memory consumption by quite a bit. I made some significant changes to my answer to reflect your idea. –  Brian Gideon Nov 24 '11 at 16:34

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