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Why do you think (or, why is it good that) Microsoft chose not to allow:

    public abstract class BaseClass
    {
        public abstract int Bar { get;}
    }

    public class ConcreteClass : BaseClass
    {
        public override int Bar
        {
            get { return 0; }
            set {}
        }
    }
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4  
StackOverflow has limited ability to answer questions on behalf of Microsoft. Consider rephrasing your question. –  Jay Bazuzi Sep 18 '08 at 3:59
    
Incidentally, a simple remedy for this annoying behavior in .net is to have a non-virtual read-only property Foo which does nothing but wrap a protected abstract GetFoo method. An abstract derived type can shadow the property with a non-virtual read-write property which does nothing but wrap the aforementioned GetFoo method along with an abstract SetFoo method; a concrete derived type could do the above but supply definitions for GetFoo and SetFoo. –  supercat Oct 30 '12 at 19:33

15 Answers 15

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Because the writer of Baseclass has explicitly declared that Bar has to be a read-only property. It doesn't make sense for derivations to break this contract and make it read-write.

I'm with Microsoft on this one.
Let's say I'm a new programmer who has been told to code against the Baseclass derivation. i write something that assumes that Bar cannot be written to (since the Baseclass explicitly states that it is a get only property). Now with your derivation, my code may break. e.g.

public class BarProvider
{ BaseClass _source;
  Bar _currentBar;

  public void setSource(BaseClass b)
  {
    _source = b;
    _currentBar = b.Bar;
  }

  public Bar getBar()
  { return _currentBar;  }
}

Since Bar cannot be set as per the BaseClass interface, BarProvider assumes that caching is a safe thing to do - Since Bar cannot be modified. But if set was possible in a derivation, this class could be serving stale values if someone modified the source object's Bar property externally. The point being 'Be Open, avoid doing sneaky things and surprising people*'

Update: Ilya Ryzhenkov asks 'Why don't interfaces play by the same rules then?' Hmm.. this gets muddier as I think about it.
An interface is a contract that says 'expect an implementation to have a read property named Bar.' Personally I'm much less likely to make that assumption of read-only if I saw an Interface. When i see a get-only property on an interface, I read it as 'Any implementation would expose this attribute Bar'... on a base-class it clicks as 'Bar is a read-only property'. Of course technically you're not breaking the contract.. you're doing more. So you're right in a sense.. I'd close by saying 'make it as hard as possible for misunderstandings to crop up'.

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44  
I am still not convinced. Even if there is no explicit setter, this doesn't guarantee that the property will always return the same object - it can still be changed by some other method. –  ripper234 Sep 17 '08 at 15:12
11  
Shouldn't the same be true for interfaces, then? You can have readonly property on interface and read/write on implementing type. –  Ilya Ryzhenkov Sep 19 '08 at 18:52
23  
I disagree: the base class only declared the property as having no setter; that is not the same as the property being read-only. "Read-only" is only a meaning you assign to it. There are no relevant guarantees built into C# at all. You could have a get-only property that changes every time, or a get/set property where the setter throws an InvalidOperationException("This instance is read-only"). –  romkyns Apr 3 '10 at 13:09
9  
Looking at getters and setters as methods, I don't see why it should be a "breach of contract" any more than adding a new method. A base-class contract has nothing to do with what functionality is not present, only with what is present. –  Sahuagin Jun 27 '12 at 1:12
10  
-1 I disagree with this answer, and find it misguiding. Since a base class defines the behaviour that any class must abide to (See Liskov's Substitution Principle), but does not (and should not) restrict to add behaviour. A base class may only define what the behaviour must be, and it cannot (and should not) specify what the behaviour 'must not be' (i.e. 'must not be writable at concrete levels)'. –  Marcel Valdez Orozco Mar 16 '13 at 22:16

I stumbled across the very same problem today and I think a have a very valid reason for wanting this.

First I'd like to argue that having a get-only property doesn't necessarily translate into read-only. I interpret it as "From this interface/abtract you can get this value", that doesn't mean that some implementation of that interface/abstract class wont need the user/program to set this value explicitly. Abstract classes serve the purpose of implementing part of the needed functionality. I see absolutely no reason why an inherited class couldn't add a setter without violating any contracts.

The following is a simplified example of what I needed today. I ended up having to add a setter in my abstract class just to get around this. The reason for adding the setter and not adding, say, a SetProp method is that one particular implementation of the interface used DataContract/DataMember for serialization of Prop, which would have been made needlessly complicated if I had to add another property just for the purpose of serialization.

    interface ITest
{
    // Other stuff
    string Prop { get; }
}

// Implements other stuff
abstract class ATest : ITest
{
    abstract public string Prop { get; }
}

// This implementation of ITest needs the user to set the value of Prop
class BTest : ATest
{
    string foo = "BTest";
    public override string Prop
    {
        get { return foo; }
        set { foo = value; } // Not allowed. 'BTest.Prop.set': cannot override because 'ATest.Prop' does not have an overridable set accessor
    }
}

// This implementation of ITest generates the value for Prop itself
class CTest : ATest
{
    string foo = "CTest";
    public override string Prop
    {
        get { return foo; }
        // set; // Not needed
    }
}

I know this is just a "my 2 cents" post, but I feel with the original poster and trying to rationalize that this is a good thing seems odd to me, especially considering that the same limitations doesn't apply when inheriting directly from an interface.

Also the mention about using new instead of override does not apply here, it simply doesn't work and even if it did it wouldn't give you the result wanted, namely a virtual getter as described by the interface.

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I think the main reason is simply that the syntax is too explicit for this to work any other way. This code:

public override int MyProperty { get { ... } set { ... } }

is quite explicit that both the get and the set are overrides. There is no set in the base class, so the compiler complains. Just like you can't override a method that's not defined in the base class, you can't override a setter either.

You might say that the compiler should guess your intention and only apply the override to the method that can be overridden (i.e. the getter in this case), but this goes against one of the C# design principles - that the compiler must not guess your intentions, because it may guess wrong without you knowing.

I think the following syntax might do nicely, but as Eric Lippert keeps saying, implementing even a minor feature like this is still a major amount of effort...

public int MyProperty
{
    override get { ... }
    set { ... }
}

or, for autoimplemented properties,

public int MyProperty { override get; set; }
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I agree that not being able to override a getter in a derived type is an anti-pattern. Read-Only specifies lack of implementation, not a contract of a pure functional (implied by the top vote answer).

I suspect Microsoft had this limitation either because the same misconception was promoted, or perhaps because of simplifying grammar; though, now that scope can be applied to get or set individually, perhaps we can hope override can be too.

The misconception indicated by the top vote answer, that a read-only property should somehow be more "pure" than a read/write property is ridiculous. Simply look at many common read only properties in the framework; the value is not a constant / purely functional; for example, DateTime.Now is read-only, but anything but a pure functional value. An attempt to 'cache' a value of a read only property assuming it will return the same value next time is risky.

In any case, I've used one of the following strategies to overcome this limitation; both are less than perfect, but will allow you to limp beyond this language deficiency:

   class BaseType
   {
      public virtual T LastRequest { get {...} }
   }

   class DerivedTypeStrategy1
   {
      /// get or set the value returned by the LastRequest property.
      public bool T LastRequestValue { get; set; }

      public override T LastRequest { get { return LastRequestValue; } }
   }

   class DerivedTypeStrategy2
   {
      /// set the value returned by the LastRequest property.
      public bool SetLastRequest( T value ) { this._x = value; }

      public override T LastRequest { get { return _x; } }

      private bool _x;
   }
share|improve this answer
    
DateTime.Now is purely functional, in that it has no side-effects (the fact that it takes time to execute might conceivably be called a side-effect, but since execution time--at least when bounded and short--is not considered a side-effect of any other method, I wouldn't consider it to be one here either). –  supercat Oct 30 '12 at 19:14
    
Hi supercat. You are correct about externally observable side effects preventing a function from being pure, but the other constraint is that a pure function result value must only depend on the parameters. A pure static property, as a function, must therefore be both immutable and constant. A sophisticated compiler can replace all subsequent calls to a pure function with no parameters with the result returned by the first call. –  T.Tobler Jan 10 '13 at 2:13
    
You're correct that my terminology was imprecise, but I think appropriateness of something being a read-only property rather than a method is dependent upon a lack of side-effects, rather than purity. –  supercat Jan 10 '13 at 2:53

You could perhaps go around the problem by creating a new property:

public new int Bar 
{            
    get { return 0; }
    set {}        
}

int IBase.Bar { 
  get { return Bar; }
}
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2  
But you can do this only when implementing an interface, not when inheriting from a base class. You'd have to choose another name. –  svick May 5 '11 at 16:06

I can understand all your points, but effectively, C# 3.0's automatic properties get useless in that case.

You can't do anything like that:

public class ConcreteClass : BaseClass
{
    public override int Bar
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }
}

IMO, C# should not restrict such scenarios. It's the responsibility of the developer to use it accordingly.

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I don't understand your point. Do you concur that C# should allow adding a setter, or are you with most of the other people that answered this question? –  ripper234 Sep 20 '08 at 15:21
2  
As I said, IMO, C# should allow adding a setter. It's the responsibility of the developer to use it accordingly. –  Thomas Danecker Sep 23 '08 at 15:13

The problem is that for whatever reason Microsoft decided that there should be three distinct types of properties: read-only, write-only, and read-write, only one of which may exist with a given signature in a given context; properties may only be overridden by identically-declared properties. To do what you want it would be necessary to create two properties with the same name and signature--one of which was read-only, and one of which was read-write.

Personally, I wish that the whole concept of "properties" could be abolished, except that property-ish syntax could be used as syntactic sugar to call "get" and "set" methods. This would not only facilitate the 'add set' option, but would also allow for 'get' to return a different type from 'set'. While such an ability wouldn't be used terribly often, it could sometimes be useful to have a 'get' method return a wrapper object while the 'set' could accept either a wrapper or actual data.

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This is not impossible. You simply have to use the "new" keyword in your property. For example,

namespace {
    public class Base {
        private int _baseProperty = 0;

        public virtual int BaseProperty {
            get {
                return _baseProperty;
            }
        }

    }

    public class Test : Base {
        private int _testBaseProperty = 5;

        public new int BaseProperty {
            get {
                return _testBaseProperty;
            }
            set {
                _testBaseProperty = value;
            }
        }
    }
}

It appears as if this approach satisfies both sides of this discussion. Using "new" breaks the contract between the base class implementation and the subclass implementation. This is necessary when a Class can have multiple contracts (either via interface or base class).

Hope this helps

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25  
This answer is wrong because the property marked new no longer overrides the virtual base one. In particular, if the base property is abstract, as it is in the original post, it is impossible to use the new keyword in a non-abstract subclass because you have to override all abstract members. –  Timwi Apr 9 '11 at 13:12
    
This is phenomenally dangerous because the following return different results despite being the same object: Test t = new Test(); Base b = t; Console.WriteLine(t.BaseProperty) gives you 5, Console.WriteLine(b.BaseProperty) gives you 0, and when your successor has to debug this you'd better have moved far, far away. –  Mark Sowul Jun 18 at 14:26

Found a way to get the desired functionality:

public abstract class A
{
    public abstract int X { get; }
}
public class B : A
{
    public override int X { get { return 0; } }
}
/*public class C : B  //class you want to write but won't compile because can't override with setter
{
    private int _x;
    public override int X { get { return _x; } set { _x = value; } }
}*/
public abstract class C : B  //abstract intermediate layer
{
    public sealed override int X { get { return this.XGetter; }  }
    protected abstract int XGetter { get; }
}
public class D : C  //class you want to write that will compile
{
    private int _x;
    protected sealed override int XGetter { get { return this.X; } }
    public new virtual int X { get { return this._x; } set { this._x = value; } }
}

So instead of writing your new class C : B, which won't allow you to override the method, write D : C : B, where D is the class that you wanted to write and C is an abstract intermediary which seals away the get-only limitation on the base property. D can override that property with a new virtual method where the new getter calls the base method's getter.

The downside to this approach is that it requires an additional abstract class built into the inheritance tree.

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Gave this its own question: stackoverflow.com/questions/22210971 –  Chemical Engineer Mar 5 at 23:20

Here is a work-around in order to achieve this using Reflection:

var UpdatedGiftItem = // object value to update;

foreach (var proInfo in UpdatedGiftItem.GetType().GetProperties())
{
    var updatedValue = proInfo.GetValue(UpdatedGiftItem, null);
    var targetpropInfo = this.GiftItem.GetType().GetProperty(proInfo.Name);
    targetpropInfo.SetValue(this.GiftItem, updatedValue,null);
}

This way we can set object value on a property that is readonly. Might not work in all the scenarios though!

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Are you sure you can call a setter via reflection that does not exist (as happens in the described getter-only properties)? –  O. R. Mapper Sep 29 '13 at 15:15

Because at the IL level, a read/write property translates into two (getter and setter) methods.

When overriding, you have to keep supporting the underlying interface. If you could add a setter, you would effectively be adding a new method, which would remain invisible to the outside world, as far as your classes' interface was concerned.

True, adding a new method would not be breaking compatibility per se, but since it would remain hidden, decision to disallow this makes perfect sense.

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2  
I don't care much about "the outside world" here. I want to add functionality to a class, which is always visible only to code that knows the specific class and not the base. –  ripper234 Sep 17 '08 at 15:13
    
@ripper234 See Matt bolt's answer: if you want to make the new property visible only to users of the derived class you should use new instead of override. –  Dan Berindei Dec 2 '10 at 9:21
1  
It does not remain hidden. You're like saying you can't add a new method to a child-class because the new method will be "remain hidden from the outside world". Of course it's remain hidden from base-class perspective, but it's accessible from the clients of the child class. (I.e. to affect what the getter should return) –  Sheepy Aug 17 '11 at 3:46
    
Sheepy, that's not what I'm saying at all. I mean, exactly as you pointed out, it would remain hidden "from a base-class perspective". That's why I appended "as far as your classes' interface was concerned". If you are subclassing a base class, it is almost certain that the "outside world" will be referring to your object instances with the base class type. If they would directly use your concrete class, you would not need compatibility with the base class and you could, by all means, use new with your additions. –  Ishmaeel Aug 17 '11 at 10:13

A read-only property in the base class indicates that this property represents a value that can always be determined from within the class (for example an enum value matching the (db-)context of an object). So the responsibillity of determining the value stays within the class.

Adding a setter would cause an awkward issue here: A validation error should occur if you set the value to anything else than the single possible value it already has.

Rules often have exceptions, though. It is very well possible that for example in one derived class the context narrows the possible enum values down to 3 out of 10, yet the user of this object still needs to decide which one is correct. The derived class needs to delegate the responsibillity of determining the value to the user of this object. Important to realize is that the user of this object should be well aware of this exception and assume the responsibillity to set the correct value.

My solution in these kind of situations would be to leave the property read-only and add a new read-write property to the derived class to support the exception. The override of the original property will simply return the value of the new property. The new property can have a proper name indicating the context of this exception properly.

This also supports the valid remark: "make it as hard as possible for misunderstandings to crop up" by Gishu.

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1  
No awkwardness would be implied by a ReadableMatrix class (with a two-argument read-only indexed property) having subtypes ImmutableMatrix and MutableMatrix. Code which only needs to read a matrix, and doesn't care if it might change some time in future, could accept a parameter of type ReadableMatrix and be perfectly happy with mutable or immutable subtypes. –  supercat Oct 30 '12 at 19:28
    
An additional setter could modify a private variable within the class. The so-called "read-only" property from the base class would then still determine the value "from within the class" (by reading the new private variable). I don't see the issue there. Also look at, for example, what List<T>.Count does: It cannot be assigned to, but that does not mean it is "read-only" in that it cannot be modified by users of the class. It can very well be modified, albeit indirectly, by adding and removing list items. –  O. R. Mapper Sep 29 '13 at 15:13

Because that would break the concept of encapsulation and implementation hiding. Consider the case when you create a class, ship it, and then the consumer of your class makes himself able to set a property for which you originally provide a getter only. It would effectively disrupt any invariants of your class which you can depend on in your implementation.

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1  
-1: Having a setter does not automatically enable a descendant to break any invariants. The setter can still only change things that are already changeable by the descendant anyway. –  romkyns Apr 9 '11 at 13:07

Because a class that has a read-only property (no setter) probably has a good reason for it. There might not be any underlying datastore, for example. Allowing you to create a setter breaks the contract set forth by the class. It's just bad OOP.

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