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I am a bit confused about the usage of prototypes in Javascript.

Let's take the following example:

(1)

   function Rectangle(w, h) { 
      this.width=w; 
      this.height=h; 
      this.area=function() { this.width * this.height; }
   }

And a similar case where the area is attached to a prototype as follows:

(2)

   function Rectangle(w, h) { 
      this.width=w; 
      this.height=h; 
   }
   Rectangle.prototype.area=function() { this.width * this.height; }
  • What is the diffrence between (1) and (2) ?
  • When would you use (1) or (2) for writing methods on classes?
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5  
this.prototype doesn't exist. –  SLaks Nov 23 '11 at 14:47
2  
Right: one works, the other doesn't :-) –  Pointy Nov 23 '11 at 14:48
3  
Duplicate of : stackoverflow.com/questions/422476/… –  pradeek Nov 23 '11 at 14:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

prototypes are best shown differently.

function rectangle(w, h) {
    var rect = {};
    rect.width=w; 
    rect.height=h; 
    rect.area=function() { return this.width * this.height; };
    return rect;
}

vs

var Rectangle = {
    area: function() { return this.width * this.height; }
}

function rectangle(w, h) {
    var rect = Object.create(Rectangle);
    rect.width=w; 
    rect.height=h; 
    return rect;
}

The idea is simple, you put common stuff on a prototype object and you then inherit from it.

As for when you want to use the prototype? Always.

Of course you probably want to Improve ES5 OO with sugar

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