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I have class that works a bit like the Linq To Sql Where clause.

It builds a sequence of operations from an Expression tree.

The expression tree is an Expression<Func<bool>> (i.e. a lambda without arguments that returns a bool)

conditionBuilder.BuildCondition(() => x != 3 && y != 5);

The class works fine for normal expressions like the example above but now I need the functionality to combine expressions.

I have added And, Or methods like

var exp1 = () => x != 3;
var exp2 = () => y != 5;
var exp = ConditionBuilder.And(exp1, exp2);

but it gets complicated when combining several expressions.

I would like to write

var exp = exp1 && exp2;

but since I can't directly overload operator && I need to find some other solution. The tricky part is that resulting operations does not have a boolean overload for the bitwise operators. i.e. the result of exp1 & exp2 is int and not bool. (I can get around this by adding != 0)

So my questions now are:

  • Will it be confusing if I let operator & be a logical expression (i.e. AndAlso)?
  • operator && will work if I overload & / true / false but that will also create an implicit boolean conversion. I know implicit boolean conversion is something you want to avoid in C++ but I am not sure how it matters i C#. Also, should the overridden true and false evaulate the expression? (i.e. what should if (exp1) do?)

Edit: I already have working code like this:

public class ConditionBuilder
{
    private readonly Expression<Func<bool>> _filter;

    public ConditionBuilder(Expression<Func<bool>> filter) {
        _filter = filter;
    }

    public static ConditionBuilder And(ConditionBuilder left, ConditionBuilder right) {
        return new ConditionBuilder(Expression.Lambda<Func<bool>>(Expression.AndAlso(left._filter.Body, right._filter.Body)));
    }

    public static ConditionBuilder Or(ConditionBuilder left, ConditionBuilder right) {
        return new ConditionBuilder(Expression.Lambda<Func<bool>>(Expression.OrElse(left._filter.Body, right._filter.Body)));
    }
}

Edit 2 to clarify the questions.

The expressions are converted into another format. An example is that () => ConditionBuilder.IntField(123) == 5 is converted into @123 EQ 5 (The real format is something else but you get the idea)

The problem is that the other format doesn't have a booleen overload for the bitwise operators. This means that () => true & false is converted into True BITAND False which is not a valid expression since it returns an int and not a boolean.

If I overload & to mean AndAlso

exp1 & exp2

is a valid expression but

() => x != 3 & y != 5

is not.

My second question was if having an implicit conversion to bool causes problems in C# like it does in C++.

share|improve this question
1  
With awareness of the fact that the expression library itself has And, Or etc, I'd be wary of choosing operator overloading instead, for the same sort of functionality. You say "it gets complicated when combining several expressions", but the operator overloaded equivalent, while more concise at point of consumption, is surely going to be harder to create and debug, isn't it? –  AakashM Nov 23 '11 at 16:12

1 Answer 1

I would overload the & operator. This is not confusing since & can be logical or bitwise depending on the context.

To overload the & operator you will have to use a wrapper class (e.g. ConditionBuilder) for your overloaded operators.

You can see a full example overloading the various operators including & in the documentation for the true operator, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6x6y6z4d.aspx.


A simple example using ConditionBuilder to demonstrate overloading the & operator).

void Main ()
{
    int x = 1;
    int y = 1;

    var exp1 = new ConditionBuilder (() => x != 3);
    var exp2 = new ConditionBuilder (() => y != 5);
    var exp3 = exp1 & exp2;

    Console.WriteLine (exp3.Execute ());
}

public class ConditionBuilder
{
    private readonly Expression<Func<bool>> _filter;

    public ConditionBuilder(Expression<Func<bool>> filter) {
        _filter = filter;
    }

    public bool Execute() {
        return _filter.Compile()();
    }

    public static ConditionBuilder And(ConditionBuilder left, ConditionBuilder right) {
        return new ConditionBuilder(Expression.Lambda<Func<bool>>(Expression.AndAlso(left._filter.Body, right._filter.Body)));
    }

    public static ConditionBuilder Or(ConditionBuilder left, ConditionBuilder right) {
        return new ConditionBuilder(Expression.Lambda<Func<bool>>(Expression.OrElse(left._filter.Body, right._filter.Body)));
    }

    public static ConditionBuilder operator & (ConditionBuilder left, ConditionBuilder right) {
        // Note this could confuse users for the problem discussed below.
        // Consider using Expression.And instead of AndAlso
        return ConditionBuilder.And(left, right);
    }

    public static ConditionBuilder operator | (ConditionBuilder left, ConditionBuilder right) {
        // Note this could confuse users for the problem discussed below.
        // Consider using Expression.Or instead of OrElse
        return ConditionBuilder.Or(left, right);
    }
}

I would be careful using short-circuiting operators (AndAlso, OrElse) with & and | as given Foo() & Bar(), when Foo returns false Bar will not be called which will be unexpected by most users.


Alternative

Change ConditionBuilder's And/Or methods to be instance members and only take the right hand side as an argument.

public ConditionBuilder And(ConditionBuilder right) {
    return new ConditionBuilder(Expression.Lambda<Func<bool>>(Expression.AndAlso(_filter.Body, right._filter.Body)));
}

This gives a syntax such as var exp3 = exp1.And(exp2); which is neater than the original and will chain reasonably well exp1.And(exp2).And(exp3).

You will have to be careful when mixing And/Or since exp1.Or(exp2).And(exp3) would give you (exp1 | exp2) & exp3 rather than exp1 | (exp2 & exp3). This can be avoided using explicit parentheses such as (exp1.Or(exp2)).And(exp3) vs exp1.Or(exp2.And(exp3))


Problem with supporting &&

To support && you will need to support the true and false operators in ConditionBuilder which will mean compiling and executing the expression.

public static bool operator true (ConditionBuilder left) {
    return left.Execute();
}

public static bool operator false (ConditionBuilder left) {
    return !left.Execute();
}

When testing this with LinqPAD the result from var exp3 = exp1 && exp2 had less than ideal results.

  1. exp1 had to be executed immediately to resolve the short-circuit.
  2. When exp1 was true the resulting expression was equivalent to:
    var exp3 = () => x != 3 && y != 5
  3. When exp1 was false the resulting expression was equivalent to:
    var exp3 = () => x != 3
share|improve this answer
    
That will not work since it will create a lambda and not an expression. See my edit –  adrianm Nov 23 '11 at 16:02
    
Sorry, I was just using Func<bool> because it is simple enough to write a short example, you can have & return anything, eg return ConditionBuilder.And(lhs, rhs) –  Chris Chilvers Nov 23 '11 at 16:05
    
I've changed the example to make use of your sample condition builder. –  Chris Chilvers Nov 23 '11 at 16:13
    
Are you sure that && evaluates as if (lhs() == true) true else rhs()? My guess would guess something like be if (true(lhs)) operator&(lhs,rhs) –  adrianm Nov 23 '11 at 16:24
    
So it is, I've fixed the answer. Through testing with linq pad it seems it is actually compiled as something like; if (false(lhs)) lhs else operator&(lhs, rhs) –  Chris Chilvers Nov 23 '11 at 16:44

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