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Is there a way to calculate the largest possible file size for a JPEG image with a fixed resolution?

For example, is it possible to say that a 1024x768 image has a maximum file size of 3MB?

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closed as not a real question by CharlesB, Filburt, Jarrod Roberson, tzot, Graviton Nov 24 '11 at 14:03

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
what is worst size? –  CharlesB Nov 23 '11 at 15:34
    
You mean the largest possible size? It depends on the source image and the level of compression. Also, calculate where? –  Viruzzo Nov 23 '11 at 15:36
    
Yeah, the worst size is the maximum size, the worst compression. –  Elinyhs Nov 23 '11 at 15:40
    
Calculation = algorithm –  Elinyhs Nov 23 '11 at 15:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No there is not. It uses quantization matrices to try and reduce frequencies to 0, depending on how good that works, and how much of a pattern occurs for all these values, the compression becomes more efficient.

See JPEG Wikipedia Article, section Codec Example for more details on how the compression works. It should become clear from that that it is not possible.

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Not really. JPG compression depends on quality settings, and the content of the image. A single solid color "tile" will compress far better than a "busy" image.

E.g. a solid white 800x600 image saved in The Gimp at 85% quality is a 3,155 bytes .jpg file. Filling that same 800x600 image with the RGB noise filter produces a 134,935 byte .jpg.

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