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I have a program in which I have a 200 character string that I split into segments and am trying, without success, to put these segments into either a 2d char array or an array of pointers to strings via a function. I can successfully do this in main, but when I pass the character string and the 2d char array or pointer array to strings to a function it doesn’t work. When I print the 2d array inside the function it shows everything worked perfectly but when I print the returned array in main it only prints the final value as follows.

A simplified code sample and output is below:

void func(char *buffer, char **file_list) 
{  
  /*split buffer into segments*/  
    Strcpy((*file_list + i), segment);  
    Printf(“i = %d file_list = %s \n”,i, (*file_list + i));  /* this prints the segments perfectly*/  
}  

Main()  
{  
   Func(buffer, file_list);  
  For(i=0;i<n;i++)  
     Printf(“i= %d,split lines in main is %s\n”,i,(*file_list +i));  
}  

The printf output inside “func” is:

Segment one  
Segement two  
 ……  
Segment n  

The printf output from main is:

Segment n  
Segment n  
…..  
Segment n  

Please find the function in more detail below. I’m assuming you don’t need to see the variable declaration list.

Please note that I also tried passing the pointers as references with the view that if buffer was a reference to the original string character array then I would be pointing to that and not temporary strings. But admittedly I don’t know a lot about temporary variables.

Void func(char *buffer,  char **file_list)  
{
    newline=strstr(buffer,"\r\n");    
    while (newline != NULL  && (newline-buffer)< READ_SIZE)  
  {  
      temp_var=newline;  
      newline=strstr(newline + 1,"\r\n");  
      if( newline !=NULL )    
      {
          strncpy((*file_list+i),temp_var,(newline-temp_var));  
          printf("i= %d, file_list is %s\n",i, (*file_list+i));  
      }   
   }  
}  

Main()   
{  
    Char *buffer = (char * ) malloc(200*sizeof(char));  
    Char **file_list= blah blah ….  

   /* put 200 char string in buffer*/   

  /*file_list is still empty call func to fill it up*/     

   Func(buffer,file_list);  
   For(i=0;i<n;i++)  
      printf("i= %d, file_list is %s\n",i,(*file_list+i));  
}  

Print Output from function is:

i=0 file list is "segment one"  
i=1 file list is "segment two"  
....  
i=n file list is "segment n"  

Print Output from main is:

i=0 file list is "segment n"  
i=1 file list is "segment n"  
....  
i=n file list is "segment n" 
share|improve this question
    
That's no "simplified", that's an invalid program. Please post a snippet that compiles, runs and shows the error. –  larsmans Nov 23 '11 at 15:42
    
Thank you for your response, I have added a more detailed piece of code. If you need more please let me know –  Julia Childe Nov 23 '11 at 19:15
    
I haven't undone my -1. You shouldn't post a program that contains obvious syntax errors. –  larsmans Nov 23 '11 at 19:18
    
Hello I just updated the output I get to try to make it more clear –  Julia Childe Nov 23 '11 at 19:22
    
What syntax error are you reffering to? This compiles fine on my computer. –  Julia Childe Nov 23 '11 at 19:23

2 Answers 2

Thanks for your responses. I found that the problem was not related to returning data from the function in the incorrect way but was due to the fact that I was using the incorrect notation for the pointer to pointer arrays. However, any good references on returning data from functions would be appreciated, as there seems to be conflicting information out there on the web. For example, I don't think you need to declare a pointer to a pointer to pass the pointer by reference. At least by experimenting I found I was able to change pointer array values without passing a pointer to the pointer array to the function in the same way that you pass a normal variable by reference.

share|improve this answer

Seems like you are copying only one of your segments and not all of them. Did you intend the func call to be from the for loop?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your response. Yes it is in the form of a for loop otherwise I would not be able to print all the file_list[i] variables correctly within the function. When I try printing file list outside of the function in main it only prints the last value copied over in the way I have indicated above. –  Julia Childe Nov 23 '11 at 18:47
    
Thanks anyway but I'd like to close this question since I found that my problem was that I was using the wrong notation in my pointer to pointer chars. –  Julia Childe Nov 30 '11 at 3:59

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