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set.seed(1234) 
mydata <- data.frame (
 individual = factor(1:10), 
 M1a = factor (sample (c(1,2),10, replace = T)),
 M1b = factor (sample (c(1,2),10, replace = T)), 
  pop = factor (c(rep(1, 5), rep (2, 5))), 
 yld = rnorm(10, 10, 2))

Here M1a, M1b are fixed however individual is random.

    require(lme4)
    model1 <- lmer(yld ~  M1a + M1b + pop + (1|individual), data = mydata)
    model1
     Error in function (fr, FL, start, REML, verbose)  : 
      Number of levels of a grouping factor for the random effects
    must be less than the number of observations    

Can we do this in lme4. These are known as animal model and asrmel can do some of such things (link).

EDITS: I forget to mention the relationship matrix is rquired. The following is pedigree structure to do so. To fit the example to size, I reduce the sample size to 10.

 peddf <- data.frame (individual = factor(1:10), 
   mother = c(NA, NA, NA, 1, 1, 1, 1,3, 3,3), 
    father = c(NA, NA, NA, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2))

  individual mother father
1           1     NA     NA
2           2     NA     NA
3           3     NA     NA
4           4      1      2
5           5      1      2
6           6      1      2
7           7      1      2
8           8      3      2
9           9      3      2
10         10      3      2

In term of matrix is following (only lowerhalf triangle plus diagnonal is shown):

1   NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA
0   1   NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA
0   0   1   NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA
0.25    0.25    0   1   NA  NA  NA  NA  NA  NA
0.25    0.25    0   0.25    1   NA  NA  NA  NA  NA
0.25    0.25    0   0.25    0.25    1   NA  NA  NA  NA
0.25    0.25    0   0.25    0.25    0.25    1   NA  NA  NA
0   0.25    0.25    0.125   0.125   0.125   0.125   1   NA  NA
0   0.25    0.25    0.125   0.125   0.125   0.125   0.25    1   NA
0   0.25    0.25    0.125   0.125   0.125   0.125   0.25    0.25    1

In picture form:

enter image description here

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I don't understand why you want to treat a factor with no replicates as random effect . Could you provide us more inforation? In addition, it seems like M1a and M1b are factors and so, you should treat as such. –  Manuel Ramón Nov 23 '11 at 16:33
    
yes, you are right...individual is random factor with single replicates...similarly M1a and M1b are two fixed factors. –  jon Nov 23 '11 at 16:47
    
I saw you treated individuals as random effect. My question is why you want to do that. You can not estimate the between individuals variability because you only have one measure per individual. –  Manuel Ramón Nov 23 '11 at 17:13
    
Futhermore, the animal model you are referring to needs a relationship matrix (A). If not specific, it is like your animals were not related. I think you are missing something –  Manuel Ramón Nov 23 '11 at 17:21
1  
Would r-forge.r-project.org/projects/pedigreemm be useful? In general, you will find more expertise on mixed models at r-sig-mixed-models@r-project.org (too bad about the interface -- mailing lists are so 20th-century ...) –  Ben Bolker Nov 23 '11 at 18:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try the kinship package, which is based on nlme. See this thread on r-sig-mixed-models for details.

For non-normal responses, you'd need to modify lme4 and the pedigreemm package; see this question for details.

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As of 2013 the package kinship is defunct, and the function lmekin used in the example below by Jon is now in the package coxme –  user1256923 Nov 12 '13 at 21:08

I am expanding what Aaron said, so all credit should go to the Aaron's answer.

 kmat <- kinship(peddf$individual , peddf$father,peddf$mother)
    kmat 
              1    2    3     4     5     6     7     8     9    10
        1  0.50 0.00 0.00 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.000 0.000 0.000
        2  0.00 0.50 0.00 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.250
        3  0.00 0.00 0.50 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.250 0.250 0.250
        4  0.25 0.25 0.00 0.500 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.125 0.125 0.125
        5  0.25 0.25 0.00 0.250 0.500 0.250 0.250 0.125 0.125 0.125
        6  0.25 0.25 0.00 0.250 0.250 0.500 0.250 0.125 0.125 0.125
        7  0.25 0.25 0.00 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.500 0.125 0.125 0.125
        8  0.00 0.25 0.25 0.125 0.125 0.125 0.125 0.500 0.250 0.250
        9  0.00 0.25 0.25 0.125 0.125 0.125 0.125 0.250 0.500 0.250
        10 0.00 0.25 0.25 0.125 0.125 0.125 0.125 0.250 0.250 0.500

# without relatedness structure

model1 <- lmekin(yld ~  M1a + M1b + pop , random = ~ 1|individual, data = mydata)
Linear mixed-effects kinship model fit by maximum likelihood
  Data: mydata 
  Log-likelihood = -20.23546 
  n= 10 

Fixed effects: yld ~ M1a + M1b + pop 
              Estimate Std. Error    t value    Pr(>|t|)
(Intercept)  8.6473627   1.977203  4.3735334 0.004701001
M1a2         1.6722908   1.671041  1.0007477 0.355584122
M1b2        -0.7939123   1.671041 -0.4751003 0.651516161
pop2         0.5265145   1.671041  0.3150817 0.763369802

Wald test of fixed effects =  1.343476 df =  3 p =  0.718836

Random effects: ~1 | individual 
              individual     resid
Standard Dev:  0.9493070 1.5651426
% Variance:    0.2689414 0.7310586

# with A matrix

model2 <- lmekin(yld ~  M1a + M1b + pop , random = ~ 1|individual, varlist=list(kmat), data = mydata) 
Linear mixed-effects kinship model fit by maximum likelihood
  Data: mydata 
  Log-likelihood = -20.23548 
  n= 10 

Fixed effects: yld ~ M1a + M1b + pop 
              Estimate Std. Error    t value    Pr(>|t|)
(Intercept)  8.6473583   1.977206  4.3735251 0.004701044
M1a2         1.6722972   1.671042  1.0007511 0.355582600
M1b2        -0.7939228   1.671044 -0.4751057 0.651512529
pop2         0.5265200   1.671040  0.3150851 0.763367298

Wald test of fixed effects =  1.343489 df =  3 p =  0.7188331

Random effects: ~1 | individual 
 Variance list: list(kmat) 
               individual    resid
Standard Dev: 5.78864e-03 1.830529
% Variance:   9.99990e-06 0.999990
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is a much more useful answer than mine (and so definitely deserves credit). Thanks for working out the example. –  Aaron Nov 23 '11 at 20:13

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