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How would you complete this scheme and how many semaphores would you use to obtain

a) ABCD ACBD sequence

b) ABCD ABDC sequence

using these two processes (consider using pseudocode es: wait(s1) signal(s1) etc...)

Process 1

P1:while(1){
        .
        printf("A");
        .
        .
        printf("C");
        .
   }       

Process 2

 P2:while(1){
        .
        printf("B");
        .
        .
        printf("D");
        .
   }

Consider the dots as places where the missing code(primitives) could be inserted

@Jerry

After some internet researching I think I've got my first point (a) solved,

the solution would be to build a precedence graph like this

      A<--(s0)--^
     / \        |
(s1)-- --(s2)   |
(me)-------     |
    /   \       |
   B     C      |
    \   /       |
   -------(s3)  |
     \ /        |
      D-------->|

with INIT(s0)=INIT(ME)=1 and INIT(s1)=INIT(s2)=INIT(s3)=0

therefore I'd have P1

P1:while(1){
       wait(s0);
       printf("A");
       signal(s2);
       signal(s1);

       wait(s1);
       wait(ME);
       printf("C");
       signal(ME);
       signal(s3)
   }

and P2

P2:while(1){
       wait(s2);
       wait(ME);
       printf("B");
       signal(s3);
       signal(ME);

       wait(s3);
       wait(s3);
       printf("D");
       signal(s0)
   }

Do you think my approach is right ?, could I reduce more the number of semaphores used ? (for now there are 5 (2 mutex and 3 normal))

share|improve this question
    
I think the usual question applies: What you tried so far and what problems have you encountered? –  Jerry Coffin Nov 23 '11 at 16:02
    
What kind of statements should be put at dots? Only semaphore ops or ifs, prints, etc? –  chill Nov 23 '11 at 16:53
    
I've edited the question with a solution I've tried to find, check it out and let me know if it's right and if I can reduce more the number of semaphores used. –  Lucian Enache Nov 23 '11 at 17:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I do think your approach with a precedence graph is correct, but the problem statement is a bit unclear, for example, from the graph is looks like B and C can occur in any order, but no indication of this in the original a) and b) sequences.

(EDIT: it become clear that B and C have to alternate)

So, for case a) the following (infinite) sequence is acceptable:

ABCD ACBD ABCD ACBD ABCD ACBD ...

  A<--+
 / \  |
B<->C |
 \ /  |
  D---+

A precedes B by program logic and they are in the same thread. Likewise C precedes D for the same reasons. Hence, semaphores are needed to enforce precedence only along the edges A->C, B->D and D->A. The edge between B and C changes direction each cycle, hence we need an additional bit of state, to determine the direction: B->C or B<-C It can be done with an extra variable, or we can maintain the state implicitly by duplicating the loop bodies, like below:

#include <semaphore.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define NLOOPS 100000

sem_t s0, s1, s2, s3;

void *
process_A (void *unused)
{
  int n = NLOOPS;

  while (n--)
    {
      sem_wait (&s0);
      putchar ('A');
      sem_post (&s1);
      putchar ('B');
      sem_post (&s3);
      sem_post (&s2);

      sem_wait (&s0);
      putchar ('A');
      sem_post (&s1);
      sem_wait (&s3);
      putchar ('B');
      sem_post (&s2);
    }

  return 0;
}

void *
process_B (void *unused)
{
  int n = NLOOPS;

  while (n--)
    {
      sem_wait (&s1);
      sem_wait (&s3);
      putchar ('C');
      sem_wait (&s2);
      putchar ('D');
      sem_post (&s0);

      sem_wait (&s1);
      putchar ('C');
      sem_post (&s3);
      sem_wait (&s2);
      putchar ('D');
      sem_post (&s0);
    }

  return 0;
}


int
main ()
{
  pthread_t a, b;

  sem_init (&s0, 0, 1);
  sem_init (&s1, 0, 0);
  sem_init (&s2, 0, 0);
  sem_init (&s3, 0, 0);

  pthread_create (&a, 0, process_A, 0);
  pthread_create (&b, 0, process_B, 0);

  pthread_join (a, 0);
  pthread_join (b, 0);

  putchar ('\n');
  return 0;
}

I will leave you to implement b) by yourself :)

share|improve this answer
    
well no, the order of B and C is an EX-OR where they alternate, ABCD, ACBD, ABCD, ACBD, and so on –  Lucian Enache Nov 23 '11 at 19:42
    
@LucianEnache, ok, edited, check s3 semaphore. –  chill Nov 23 '11 at 20:25
    
so instead of duplicating the putchar statements would be a solution to use a mutual esclusion semaphore(?) –  Lucian Enache Nov 23 '11 at 20:50
    
@LucianEnache, I can't see a way to achieve this with additional semaphores. –  chill Nov 23 '11 at 21:55

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