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For any key used in a map reduce operation, elements with can key may follow some natural ordering.

Suppose we want to find elements e0 and e1 such that:

  1. each belong to the same key,
  2. they follow some ordering e0 < e1
  3. there is no element en where e0 < en < e1 with respect to our ordering.
  4. some relation between e0 and e1 holds.

(How) can that that be done efficiently using map reduce?

A usual database way of solving that is just to get a cursor over our collection ordered by our ordering. Keep track of the last seen element, and the current element and test for the relationship.

The problem with map reduce, is that within a reduce call that reduces e0 and e1 there is no wat to know if an en exists that ruins your assumption that e0 and e1 are successive.

Are there clever ways around this? Or mapreduce frameworks that can guarantee that a set of elements within a reduce call are sequential? Can it be done in mongodb?

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I am not sure I am following, are you interested in finding such elements in a map/reduce step? or within the reduce step? if the first: map/reduce can be used for sorting, so of course it can find such a pair. –  amit Nov 23 '11 at 16:28
    
It seems to do this you'd need as much memory or secondary storage as data. Whereas the cursor/iterator approach requires no extra memory. Can you provide links to algorithm implementation? I can't seem to find anything good. –  z5h Nov 23 '11 at 16:36
    
Question: "How can one solve sequential problems in map reduce architecture?" Answer: Inefficiently. –  Patrick87 Nov 23 '11 at 16:52
    
@Patrick87, I suspected as much (hence the question). Was just hoping for some more substantial comments/references/ideas. –  z5h Nov 23 '11 at 17:32
    
@z5h: MapReduce is a paradigm for parallel programming. Amdahl's law limits the speedup achieved due to parallelization to 1/(S+P/N), where S and P are the fractions of serial/parallel portions of the code and N is the number of processors. If S=1, then P=0 and speedup is 1, i.e., there is no benefit (in terms of computation time) to using any number N of processors. So if you have a "sequential" (i.e., 100% non-parallel, like computing a non-associative reduction operation) job, MapReduce isn't ever going to help, ever. Note: maybe your problem is more parallel than you think. –  Patrick87 Nov 23 '11 at 19:21
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MapReduce is a paradigm for parallel programming. Amdahl's law limits the speedup achieved due to parallelization to 1/(S+P/N), where S and P are the fractions of serial/parallel portions of the code and N is the number of processors. If S=1, then P=0 and speedup is 1, i.e., there is no benefit (in terms of computation time) to using any number N of processors. So if you have a "sequential" (i.e., 100% non-parallel, like computing a non-associative reduction operation) job, MapReduce isn't ever going to help, ever. Note: maybe your problem is more parallel than you think.

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The practical example of your case is clickstream analysis as part of webanalytics.

In that practical example we have found that the we could solve this in Hadoop in two ways:

  1. Simply pull all events in memory in the reducer, sort them in memory and do the work.
  2. Use the hadoop feature called "secondary sort" and let the records arrive at the reducer in the sorting order of your choice.

Although my answer is based on my experience with hadoop, I think this train of thought may hekp you in the mongodb context.

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You can pass a sort option to map-reduce. That should get you what you want: http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/MapReduce#MapReduce-Overview

Still, it's hard to answer your question without a more concrete example.

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Right. It means my inputs to reduce will be ordered, but it doesn't mean I won't be missing my 'en' in any particular reduce call. –  z5h Nov 23 '11 at 19:58
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