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I use the following AJAX request to retrieve a number of pages, whose titles I have in an array called pages. Each response goes into a separate div, and I want to give each of those divs an id the same as the page title.

Of course, by the time my requests come back, [i] has reached pages.length and all my div names are undefined.

for ( i = 0; i < pages.length; i++ ) {
  $.ajax({
    //async:false makes it work but it slows things down too much
    url: 'ajax_' + pages[i],
    success: function(data) {
      $('<div id="' + pages[i] + '">' + data + '</div>').appendTo('div.content');
      }
  });
 }

How can I achieve a good lockstep between requesting and responding variables?

Thanks!

NB I would rather keep it asynchronous (i.e. not use async:false).

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Quick and dirty:

$.ajax({
    url: 'ajax_' + pages[i],

    context: i, // set `this` to `i` in the callback

    success: function(data) {
        // `this` is the correct, "frozen" `i`
        $('<div id="' + pages[this] + '">' + data + '</div>').appendTo('div.content');
    }
});

Note that this is always coerced into an object - like new Number(2) instead of 2. Nevertheless they can be used to access array indices.

There are cleaner ways to do this, like creating a closure, but this may work fine for you (i.e. if you aren't using this for anything else in the callback).

share|improve this answer
    
interesting. and clever. and works. except for on the 0th element...? – djb Nov 23 '11 at 16:37
    
could this be because new Number(0) is undefined? -- sorry! scratch that, it's not... – djb Nov 23 '11 at 16:37
    
Ah yes, 0 is "falsy" and jQuery will act as if it is undefined. Try context: new Number(i) instead. – pimvdb Nov 23 '11 at 16:39
    
tremend. thank you, accepted. – djb Nov 23 '11 at 16:40
    
Looking at it, you might want to use context: pages[i] instead to make it a little bit more semantical (this is then really a page). – pimvdb Nov 23 '11 at 16:45

You should always use the var keyword in your for loop variables to properly scope them. Otherwise this loop is accessing a global variable called i, which might or might not clash with another loop.

But that's not the solution to the exact problem you have. You need to cache a reference to the current page and use that in the ajax response.

for ( var i = 0; i < pages.length; i++ ) {
  var page = pages[i];
  $.ajax({
    //async:false makes it work but it slows things down too much
    url: 'ajax_' + page,
    success: function(data) {
      $('<div id="' + page + '">' + data + '</div>').appendTo('div.content');
      }
  });
 }
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for this, but sadly when the callback comes in, page is set to the last value in the array – djb Nov 23 '11 at 16:30
1  
this will suffer from a similar problem. declaring 'var page' inside the loop doesn't give it a new scope, unlike other languages like C#. JavaScript has lexical scoping, not block scope. page has the same scope as everything inside that function – Matt Nov 23 '11 at 16:37
    
bah, you're right. $.each(pages, function(i, page){}) instead of the for loop would work though right? Since you're introducing a new function into the mix? – Mike Ruhlin Nov 23 '11 at 17:44

JavaScript has something called lexical scope, which is different from block scope that most are familiar with. In JS, to give something a new scope, it has to be inside another function, not just curly braces { }.

The reason why async: false works is because you are forcing it to wait for the response before moving on, which avoids your scope issue.

Try this:

for ( i = 0; i < pages.length; i++ ) {
    $.ajax({
        //async:false makes it work but it slows things down too much
        url: 'ajax_' + pages[i],
        success: (function(index){ 
              return function(data) {
                  $('<div id="' + pages[i] + '">' + data + '</div>').appendTo('div.content');
              };
        })(i)
    });
}
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