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I have a low level caching mechanism which receives a json array from a server and caches it in a file.

The actual caching mechanism is just saving large streams to a file without awareness that it is json. Therefore when I would like to append a stream to an existing file cache by aggregating streams into another file I end up with something like this:

[{"id":3144,"created_at":"1322064201"}][{"id":3144,"created_at":"1322064201"}] 

where obviously what I desire is something like this:

[{"id":3144,"created_at":"1322064201"},{"id":3144,"created_at":"1322064201"}]

What is the most efficient/effective way of doing this?

I have looked into FilterReader but seen as I know that all I actually need to do is remove the last char ] of the existing cache and first char of new content [ and add a , I thought there may be a better way than checking every char in these big streams.

For context my code does something like this:

    ... input stream passed with new content

    File newCache = new File("JamesBluntHatersClub")
    FileOutputStream tempFileOutputStream = new FileOutputStream(newCache);
    FileInputStream fileInputStream = new FileInputStream(existingCache);
    copyStream(fileInputStream, tempFileOutputStream);
    copyStream(inputStream, tempFileOutputStream);

    ... clean up

UPDATE:

Having implemented a FilterReader which checks chars one at a time like so:

@Override
public int read() throws IOException {
    int content = super.read();
    // replace open square brackets with comma
    switch (content) {
        case SQUARE_BRACKETS_OPEN:
            return super.read();
        case SQUARE_BRACKETS_CLOSE:
            return super.read();
        default:
            return content;
    }
}

the processing time is unacceptably slow so I am looking for another option. I was thinking about using the file size to determine the size of the file and removing the tail square bracket this way

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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This method did the trick

/**
 * Copys the input streams in order to the output stream and retains json array
 * format
 * 
 * @param inputStreamA
 * @param inputStreamB
 * @param outputStream
 * @throws IOException
 */
private void copyStreamsToOutput(InputStream inputStreamA, InputStream inputStreamB,
        FileOutputStream outputStream) throws IOException {
    copyStream(inputStreamA, outputStream);
    // truncate file to remove trailing ']'
    outputStream.getChannel().truncate(outputStream.getChannel().size() - 1);
    // add comma between json objects
    outputStream.write(COMMA);
    // skip '['
    inputStreamB.skip(1);
    // and copy rest of streamas normal
    copyStream(inputStreamB, outputStream);
}

Would be very interested to here if this is bad practice, I am guessing there may be encoding issues.

UPDATE

/**
 * Copys the input streams in order to output stream and retains json array
 * format
 * 
 * @param inputStreamA
 * @param inputStreamB
 * @param outputStream
 * @throws IOException
 */
private void copyStreamsToOutput(InputStream inputStreamA, InputStream inputStreamB,
        FileOutputStream outputStream) throws IOException {
    copyStream(inputStreamA, outputStream);
    long channelSize = outputStream.getChannel().size();
    // truncate file to remove trailing ']'
    outputStream.getChannel().truncate(channelSize - 1);
    // check to see if array was empty (2 = [])
    if (channelSize > 2) {
        // add comma between json objects
        outputStream.write(COMMA);
    }
    // skip '['
    inputStreamB.skip(1);
    // and copy rest of streams normal
    copyStream(inputStreamB, outputStream);
    long newChannelSize = outputStream.getChannel().size();
    // check if we haven't just added a empty array
    if(newChannelSize - channelSize < 2){
        // if so truncate to remove comma 
        outputStream.getChannel().truncate(channelSize - 1);
        outputStream.write(CLOSE_SQUARE_BRACKET);
    }
}

Added ability to handle an empty json array in either stream

share|improve this answer
    
Seem you need to start with a non-empty cache ( [] ?). You could replace the last char from ] to ,. –  Joop Eggen Nov 25 '11 at 17:34
    
I am not sure I fully understand, you are suggesting I write '[]' to outputstream first and then replace the last ']' with ','? –  zode64 Nov 25 '11 at 17:40
    
As you already suggested your method won't work for every encoding. In such cases I add some assertions to the code and mention the limitations of the method in the Javadoc. After adding some unit tests, this is quality code, not bad practice. The processing time of your first solution had been unacceptably slow? Did you wrap the argument of the FilterReader in a BufferedReader to improve the performance? Just asking ... –  rwoo Jul 6 '12 at 15:24
    
@rwoo It was on a mobile device and the amount of data cached in the file could have got very large. I seem to remember I was using the BufferedReader in my first solution at some stage. The problem was how big the destination file grew. In this case 2 seconds was too much. –  zode64 Jul 6 '12 at 15:33
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