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The documentation says you can use $.noConflict() like this:

jQuery.noConflict();
(function($) { 
  $(function() {
    // more code using $ as alias to jQuery
  });
})(jQuery);
// other code using $ as an alias to the other library

It also states that calling it returns an instance of the jQuery object, so I could do this:

jQuery.noConflict()(function(){
    // code using jQuery
}); 
// other code using $ as an alias to the other library

However, is this combination valid?

(function($) { 
  $(function() {
    // more code using $ as alias to jQuery
  });
})(jQuery.noConflict());
// other code using $ as an alias to the other library

If so, is there a reason to not do it this way? And also (if it works), why not always use this method to guarantee that inside of our closure, $ == jQuery?

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2  
The only downside I see is that if you have multiple blocks like that, you'd be unnecessarily calling jQuery.noConflict() more than once. Admittedly, that's not a very significant downside. –  Wiseguy Nov 23 '11 at 16:59
    
@Wiseguy Yeah I think you'd just do it on the first closure, otherwise it is a bit of a waste. –  JesseBuesking Nov 23 '11 at 20:52
    
Then you'd have to keep track of which block is the first loaded. What if you later add a block/include a .js file above the previous first one? I'd just as well have <script>jQuery.noConflict();</script> at the very top and just use (function($){})(jQuery) throughout. Basically boils down to personal preference, I guess. –  Wiseguy Nov 23 '11 at 21:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The last method works as well - jQuery.noConflict() returns the jQuery object, which is passed as the $ argument to the function.

I don't see a reason to not do it that way and would prefer it to the other methods.

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I don't see why not since jQuery.noConflict returns the jQuery object and it's evaluated before the function is called.

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