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I have this situation

object SuperHorribleLongName {
   trait X {
       private[SuperHorribleLongName] def internalGaga() : Unit
   }
}

and I'm trying to get something like this working:

object SuperHorribleLongName {
   private type Sup = SuperHorribleLongName.type
   trait X {
       private[Sup] def internalGaga() : Unit
   }
}

but that just gives me "error: Sup is not an enclosing class"... I also tried type Sup = this.type, but still it doesn't work.

Anyways to achieve a nice shortcut for my outer object when using as private scope parameter? I do want to keep the long name for the object, and I have lots of private methods, that's why it gets really in my way.

share|improve this question
    
I don't believe it is possible to use type aliases for member scoping. –  Neil Essy Nov 23 '11 at 18:50
    
I'd guess the same. Did you try putting the type alias inside X though? And possibly without the .type. –  mpartel Nov 23 '11 at 18:54
    
@mpartel -- I tried your suggestion. Same result, doesn't work. I also tried to use import with an import alias, still no luck. –  0__ Nov 23 '11 at 22:03
    
The dumb solution, of course, is to simply not use a SuperHorribleLongName in the first place. –  Dan Burton Nov 23 '11 at 23:02
    
@Dan we'll its actually DeterministicSkipOctree which has a character count even higher than SuperHorribleLongName, and I really like to keep the name, but would like to use an abbreviation inside, as the private[DeterministicSkipOctree] really impair readability. I don't see why type aliases or import aliases shouldn't work. –  0__ Nov 24 '11 at 0:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm know sure it suits your hierarchy, but what about putting all you private methods in a

private trait Y {

Otherwise, you can always mimic a namespace :

object SuperHorribleLongName {
object SHLN { //Dummy alias
  trait X {
     private[SHLN] def internalGaga() : Unit
  }
}
type X = SHLN.X  //Lift into main object
}

It's not satisfying, since SHLN is visible, and turning it private prevents lifting X. And it's messy.
So, let turn the problem inside/out :

private object SHLN {
   trait X {
     private[SHLN] def internalGaga() : Unit
  }
}

//Expose the instance under wanted name
val SuperHorribleLongName = SHLN
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately not, as X should be visible, thus on the user side we have SuperHorribleLongName#X for example. –  0__ Dec 1 '11 at 1:22
    
That's the drawback of namespaces, but you may lift the symbols you want to expose. Anyway I've updated my answer with another approach. –  John Optional Smith Dec 3 '11 at 19:46

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