Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
function Activity() {

this.LoadFile = function (path, targetElement) {

    $.ajax({
        url: path,
        dataType: 'html',
        success: function (data) {
            targetElement.html(data);
        }

    });
};

this.LoadFile = function (path, targetElement, onSuccess) {

    $.ajax({
        url: path,
        dataType: 'html',
        success: function (data) {
            targetElement.html(data);
            onSuccess(data);
        }

    });
};

}

If i try to pass 2 arguments, i get onSuccess is not a function so i suppose this isnt working. Is it possible to use overloads in javascipt?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's no way of directly specifying overloaded methods as such in JS.

There are many workarounds.

In your case, you can define the function with 3 parameters:

function (path, targetElement, onSuccess)

and if the function is called with only 2 parameters, onSuccess will be undefined:

function (data) {
  targetElement.html(data);
  if (onSuccess) {
    onSuccess(data);
  }
}

You may want to look at jQuery.Callbacks for handling event callbacks, although your function could be rewritten using .load.


For programmers coming from the Java/C# world of overloading learn the JavaScript way you can use a structure like this (not recommended, it's simply an example for familiarity):

function foo() {
  var fns = {};
  fns[0] = function () {
    //no params
  };
  fns[1] = function () {
    //1 param
  };
  fns[2] = function () {
    //2 params
  };
  fns[arguments.length]();
}

to provide separate functions for each "overload", however it's not very flexible and symptomatic of a poorly planned function.


Oftentimes rather than using a large set of parameters, a single options parameter will be used to contain the available parameters:

function foo(options) {
  var settings = $.extend({}, foo.defaultSettings, options);
  //do stuff with settings
}
foo.defaultSettings = {
  bar: 'baz',
  fizz: 'buzz'
}
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe its better to pass one argument as an object, containing different number of arguments... –  Johan Nov 23 '11 at 17:34
1  
That recommended structure is simply stupid. Tell them to stop doing it wrong and learn javascript –  Raynos Nov 23 '11 at 17:35
    
@Raynos, i never recommended that structure. I was trying to make a point about it. It's ridiculous hence the "symptomatic of a poorly planned function". I guess i wasn't clear enough, so I'll edit it. –  zzzzBov Nov 23 '11 at 17:36

No.
Javascript does not support method overloading.

Instead, you can make a single method that takes all three parameters, then check inside the method whether the third parameter was actually passed. (all Javascript function parameters are optional)

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, any alternatives? –  Johan Nov 23 '11 at 17:13
    
@Johan: Yes; treat the parameter as optional. –  SLaks Nov 23 '11 at 17:15

There is still another way to go. Don't give any parameters in the function definition and then examine the arguments array(). You can even examine the types of the parameters given, to branch inside your function. The example below will alert # 1 # and Num(2)

/** 
 * Usage
 * example(number param1) 
 * example(string, number)
 */
function example() { // no parameters
    if (arguments.length == 1 && typeof arguments[0] == 'number') {
        alert(' # ' + arguments[0] + ' # ')
    }
    if (arguments.length == 2 && typeof arguments[0] == 'string' && typeof arguments[1] == 'number') {
        alert(arguments[0] + '(' + arguments[1] + ')')
    }

}
example(1);
example('Num', 2)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.