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str_repeat(A, B) repeat string A, B times:

$string = "This is a " . str_repeat("test", 2) . 
          "! " . str_repeat("hello", 3) . " and Bye!";  

// Return "This is a testtest! hellohellohello and Bye!"

I need reverse operation:

str_shrink($string, array("hello", "test")); 
// Return "This is a test(x2)! hello(x3) and Bye!" or
//        "This is a [test]x2! [hello]x3 and Bye!"

Best and efficient way for create str_shrink function?

share|improve this question
4  
What have you tried so far? – corsiKa Nov 23 '11 at 17:37
1  
Erasing repetitions (words in array), count, and adding a "xT" (times repeated). I'm thinking use substr_count() or regexp, but I want a efficient way. – Manz Nov 23 '11 at 17:54
    
How have you tried that in code? – BoltClock Nov 23 '11 at 17:55
2  
"Premature optimization is the root of all evil." Try something, if it's too slow, then optimize or try something else. – Michael Mior Nov 23 '11 at 17:59
1  
@Manz - Try it. I've updated my post to have the regex-way be as efficient as possible, it will hopefully hold up in terms of efficiency. – nickb Nov 24 '11 at 6:59
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here are two versions that I could come up with.

The first uses a regular expression and replaces duplicate matches of the $needle string with a single $needle string. This is the most vigorously tested version and handles all possibilities of inputs successfully (as far as I know).

function str_shrink( $str, $needle)
{
    if( is_array( $needle))
    {
        foreach( $needle as $n)
        {
            $str = str_shrink( $str, $n);   
        }
        return $str;
    }
    $regex = '/(' . $needle . ')(?:' . $needle . ')+/i';
    return preg_replace_callback( $regex, function( $matches) { return $matches[1] . '(x' . substr_count( $matches[0], $matches[1]) . ')'; }, $str);
}

The second uses string manipulation to continually replace occurrences of the $needle concatenated with itself. Note that this one will fail if $needle.$needle occurs more than once in the input string (The first one does not have this problem).

function str_shrink2( $str, $needle)
{
    if( is_array( $needle))
    {
        foreach( $needle as $n)
        {
            $str = str_shrink2( $str, $n);   
        }
        return $str;
    }
    $count = 1; $previous = -1;
    while( ($i = strpos( $str, $needle.$needle)) > 0)
    {
        $str = str_replace( $needle.$needle, $needle, $str);
        $count++;
        $previous = $i;
    }
    if( $count > 1)
    {
        $str = substr( $str, 0, $previous) . $needle .'(x' . $count . ')' . substr( $str, $previous + strlen( $needle));
    }
    return $str;
}

See them both in action

Edit: I didn't realize that the desired output wanted to include the number of repetitions. I've modified my examples accordingly.

share|improve this answer
    
Just a note - Use the first version, there's a small bug in the second version that I haven't worked out yet. – nickb Nov 23 '11 at 18:23
1  
I've fixed the second version - They both produce correct output. – nickb Nov 23 '11 at 18:30

You can play around with tis one, not tested a lot though

function shrink($s, $parts, $mask = "%s(x%d)"){

            foreach($parts as $part){
                    $removed = 0;

                    $regex = "/($part)+/";

                    preg_match_all($regex, $s, $matches, PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE);
                    if(!$matches)
                            continue;

                    foreach($matches[0] as $m){
                            $offset = $m[1] - $removed;
                            $nb = substr_count($m[0], $part);
                            $counter = sprintf($mask, $part, $nb);
                            $s = substr($s, 0, $offset) . $counter . substr($s, $offset + strlen($m[0]));
                            $removed += strlen($m[0]) - strlen($part);    
                    }

            }
            return $s;
    }
share|improve this answer

I think you can try with:

<?php
$string = "This is a testtest! hellohellohello and Bye!";

function str_shrink($string, $array){
    $tr = array();
    foreach($array as $el){
        $n = substr_count($string, $el);
        $tr[$el] = $el.'(x'.$n.')';
        $pattern[] = '/('.$el.'\(x'.$n.'\))+/i';
    }
    return preg_replace($pattern, '${1}', strtr($string,$tr));
}

echo $string;
echo '<br/>';
echo str_shrink($string,array('test','hello'));  //This is a test(x2)! hello(x3) and Bye!
?>

I have a second version in order to works with strings:

<?php
$string = "This is a testtest! hellohellohello and Bye!";

function str_shrink($string, $array){
    $tr = array();
    $array = is_array($array) ? $array : array($array);
    foreach($array as $el){
        $sN = 'x'.substr_count($string, $el);
        $tr[$el] = $el.'('.$sN.')';
        $pattern[] = '/('.$el.'\('.$sN.'\))+/i';
    }
    return preg_replace($pattern, '${1}', strtr($string,$tr));
}

echo $string;
echo '<br/>';
echo str_shrink($string,array('test','hello'));  //This is a test(x2)! hello(x3) and Bye!
echo '<br/>';
echo str_shrink($string,'test');  //This is a test(x2)! hellohellohello and Bye!
?>
share|improve this answer
    
Applying a string that contains the needle causes it to fail, see here. This is the same problem I'm having with my second version. – nickb Nov 23 '11 at 18:25

I kept it short:

function str_shrink($haystack, $needles, $match_case = true) {
    if (!is_array($needles)) $needles = array($needles);
    foreach ($needles as $k => $v) $needles[$k] = preg_quote($v, '/');
    $regexp = '/(' . implode('|', $needles) . ')+/' . ($match_case ? '' : 'i');
    return preg_replace_callback($regexp, function($matches) {
        return $matches[1] . '(x' . (strlen($matches[0]) / strlen($matches[1])) . ')';
    }, $haystack);
}

The behavior of cases like str_shrink("aaa", array("a", "a(x3)")) is it returns "a(x3)", which I thought was more likely intended if you're specifying an array. For the other behavior, giving a result of "a(x3)(x1)", call the function with each needle individually.

If you don't want multiples of one to get "(x1)" change:

        return $matches[1] . '(x' . (strlen($matches[0]) / strlen($matches[1])) . ')';

to:

        $multiple = strlen($matches[0]) / strlen($matches[1]);
        return $matches[1] . (($multiple > 1) ? '(x' . $multiple . ')' : '');
share|improve this answer
    
Appending a string that contains the needle causes it to fail, see here. – nickb Nov 23 '11 at 18:32
    
@nickb: Huh? Because of "test(x1)ing"? That's not a fail. OP didn't specify he wanted it on word boundaries or something, though it would be simple to change it to $regexp = '/\b(' . implode('|', $needles) . ')+\b/' . ($match_case ? '' : 'i'); if that's the matching criteria that's wanted instead. I already said how to disable or enable the "(x1)". – Boann Nov 23 '11 at 18:43
    
Word boundaries are irrelevant for the problem statement - testing contains one of the needles, but that needle is not a repetition, and should therefore remain untouched. – nickb Nov 23 '11 at 22:31
    
@nickb: >not a repetition. Can't you read? OP did not specify which behavior was preferred, so I wrote code for both. – Boann Nov 24 '11 at 3:32
    
Wow. OK, let's try it this way. The first behavior (i.e. the one my demo shows) MAKES NO SENSE, as test is the repeated word, not testing. For test to be identified, the string testtest must be found somewhere in the input. Otherwise, ANY other string that contains test ISN'T a repetition of the word test, and should be LEFT ALONE. Maybe that makes sense. If not, you must not be able to read the OP. – nickb Nov 24 '11 at 6:41

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