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Does anyone know or care to speculate why implicit typing is limited to local variables?

var thingy = new Foo();

But why not...

var getFoo() {
    return new Foo(); 
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Eric Lippert did an entire blog post on the subject.

In summary, the main problem is that it would have required a major re-architecture of the C# compiler to do so. Declarations are currently processed in a single pass manner. This would require multiple passes because of the ability to form cycles between inferred variables. VB.net has roughly the same problem.

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funny, he proposes adding another feature to the language just to compensate for a compiler deficiency. There are ways to write a compiler that doesn't allow anonymous types to leak out, or that can handle a deferred first pass approach. –  Sam Saffron May 5 '09 at 14:20
4  
I am aware that there are ways to do that. We're choosing to not do any of them at this time; their costs are not worth the benefits. –  Eric Lippert May 5 '09 at 15:29
    
sorry Eric, I guess all I'm trying to say is that I'm happy to wait for the compiler refactor as opposed to voting for copying java's new(), even if we can have it sooner. It just doesn't feel like it fits right since we already have var. –  Sam Saffron May 5 '09 at 15:49
4  
Also a very restricted version of type inference for field definitions would go 99% of the way (IMHO) ... only support var dict = new Dictionary<int,int> (); Don't support var fields that are initialized via methods. –  Sam Saffron May 5 '09 at 16:59

you can use in vs 2010 Dynamic

Dynamic getFoo() { 
    return new Foo();  
} 
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Jared has a fantastic link in his answer, to a fantastic topic.

I think it does not answer the question explicitly.

Why not?

var getFoo() {
    return new Foo(); 
}

The reason for this is:

What if?

class Foo {}

var GetFoo() {
   return GetBar(); 
}

var GetBar() {
  return GetBaz(); 
}

var GetBaz() {
   return new Foo();
}

You could deduce that GetFoo is going to return Foo, but you will have to trace through all the calls that method makes and its children makes just to infer the type. As it stands the C# compiler is not designed to work in this way. It needs method and field types early in the process before the code that infers types can run.

On a purely aesthetic level I find the var definitions on methods confuse things. Its one place where I think being explicit always helps, it protects you from shooting your self in the foot by accidentally returning a type that causes your signature and a ton of other dependent method signatures to change. Worst still, you could potentially change all you signatures of a method chain without even knowing you did so if you return the value of a method that returns object and happened to be lucky.

I think var methods are best left for dynamic languages like Ruby

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10  
No, that is not the problem. We have already solved that problem in C#, as you can demonstrate. If you make getFoo into a lambda we will infer the return type of the lambda to be Foo. There are real problems though. One problem is what if "var getFoo(){...}" calls "var getBar(){...}" which in turn calls... you end up having to potentially do whole-program analysis just to type the methods. The current compiler architecture assumes that methods and fields can be typed before method bodies are analyzed. –  Eric Lippert May 5 '09 at 15:34
    
Corrected and expanded answer to reflect –  Sam Saffron May 5 '09 at 16:33

Essentially, the issue you are running into is that C# (thus far) is a statically typed language. A local variable defined as var is still statically typed, but syntactically hidden. A method returning var, on the other hand, has many implications. It becomes more of an interface for usage, and you don't gain anything by using var.

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Because it is much easyer to do. If you were to inference all types, one would need something like Hindley Milner type inference system which will in make your beloved C# into Haskel derivative language.

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I think it's because the scope of that implied type is much wider and therefore more likely to cause problems than within the scope of a single method.

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