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<div id="top">
  <table>
    <tbody>
      <tr>
        <td>Cell number one content...</td>
        <td>Cell number two content...</td>
      </tr>
    <tbody>
  </table>
</div>

Presumably, this CSS should select the entire first cell blue and the second red:

  div#top table tbody tr:first-child {
      background-color:blue;
   }
   div#top table tbody tr + tr {
      background-color:red;
   }

Instead, this is what happens: enter image description here

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You should set up a JSFiddle so that the sample rendering actually relates to the code you gave us. As far as I can tell, your rendering is consistent with your CSS. –  Christian Mann Nov 23 '11 at 18:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Not quite. :first-child in your case means "a TR which is the FIRST CHILD of a TBODY". it doesn't mean "the first child element of a TR" (the TD).

As such, you're applying the blue to the table row, not the first td that happens to be a child of tr.

if you want the first td only, then:

div#top .... tr td:first-child { background-color: blue; }
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A tr which is the first child of its parent, which may or may not be a tbody (even if the HTML guarantees it's a tbody, CSS does not). I know I know, I'm being a prick :) –  BoltClock Nov 23 '11 at 18:48
    
hence the "in your case", but yeah, I know what you mean. –  Marc B Nov 23 '11 at 18:52

You can also use CSS3 if you want to alternate row colors:

tr:nth-child(odd)    { background-color:#eee; }

tr:nth-child(even)    { background-color:#fff; }
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If you want second-child only you need to use nth-child(2). What you are using now, tr + tr is affecting every tr that follows a tr, or, every tr after the first.

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Use td:nth-child(1) for the first column and td:nth-child(2) for the second.

div#top table tbody tr:nth-child(1) td:nth-child(1) {
      background-color:blue;
   }
   div#top table tbody tr:nth-child(1)  td:nth-child(2) {
      background-color:red;
   }
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Have you tried using nth-child?:

div#top table tbody tr:nth-child(2) { 
  background-color:red; 
} 

Here's a jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/HGdzx/

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