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Here's an example of what I'm trying to do:

def 9()
  run_playback_command(NINE_COMMAND)
end

I'd like it that way because it's supposed to be used later like this:

if(channelNumber != nil)
  splitChannel = "#{channelNumber}".split(//)
  if(splitChannel[3] != nil)
    response = "#{splitChannel[3]}"()
  end
  if(splitChannel[2] != nil)
    response = "#{splitChannel[2]}"()
  end
  if(splitChannel[1] != nil)
    response = "#{splitChannel[1]}"()
  end
  if(splitChannel[0] != nil)
    response = "#{splitChannel[0]}"()
  end
end

Sorry for the trouble if this is a simple question! I'm very new at Ruby.

Edit:

Here's what I'm trying to get Siri to do:

if(phrase.match(/(switch to |go to )channel (.+)\s (on )?(the )?(directv|direct tv)( dvr| receiver)?/i))

  self.plugin_manager.block_rest_of_session_from_server
  response = nil

  if(phrase.match(/channel \s([0-9]+|zero|one|two|three|four|five|six|seven|eight|nine)/))        
    channelNumber = $1

    if(channelNumber.to_i == 0)
      channelNumber = map_siri_numbers_to_int(channelNumber)
    end

    channelNumber.to_s.each_char{ |c| run_playback_command(COMMAND[c]) }
  end

No wonder it's not reading the channel. Help?

share|improve this question
1  
I read this like 3 times and am still not sure what you want to do. You can't define 9 as a method, please explain how 9 is relevant to the code snippet. –  Gazler Nov 23 '11 at 18:57
    
I'm trying to make a DirecTV channel changer for SiriProxy. The problem is, you have to send the button presses one by one to the receiver. In the bottom code snippet, it splits up the channel and sends the numbers to the definitions which then run the command. –  williammck Nov 23 '11 at 19:10

2 Answers 2

Is this what you need?

COMMAND = {
  "0" => ZERO_COMMAND,
  "1" => ONE_COMMAND,
  "2" => TWO_COMMAND,
  #...
  "9" => NINE_COMMAND
}

channelNumber.to_s.each_char{ |c| run_playback_command(COMMAND[c]) }

You don't even need to check for nil? since nil.to_s is an empty string, and thus the each_char iterator will not process any characters.

As an aside, you cannot define (or invoke) a method whose name is not a legal identifier (you can't start with a digit) using standard syntax, but this is technically possible:

class Foo
  define_method "9" do
    puts "It's nine!"
  end
end

f = Foo.new
c = "9"
f.send(c)
#=> "It's nine!"

p (f.methods - Object.methods)
#=> [:"9"]
share|improve this answer

here, have a proper solution:

callbacks = {"9" => lambda { run_playback_command(NINE_COMMAND) } }

if channelNumber
  splitChannel = channelNumber.to_s.split(//)
  splitChannel.each do |number|
    callbacks[number].call
  end
end

Your collection of ifs is just a very verbose way of writing splitChannel.each.

share|improve this answer
    
Will this split all of the numbers? If the channelNumber is 1231, I need it to send a command for 1 then 2 then 3 then 1. –  williammck Nov 23 '11 at 19:11
    
Actually my code didn't make much sense (the find doesn't), fixed it. –  Dominik Honnef Nov 23 '11 at 19:15

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