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var string = function (base) { 
  return { 
    add: function (added) {
      return base + added;
  }
 }
}

text = string("robots").add(" are awesome");

console.log(text);

// robots are awesome

text2 = string("robots").add(" are awesome").add(" everytime!");

console.log(text2);

// TypeError: Object robots are awesome has no method 'add'

How do I make this work? What can you do to share the method 'add' across certain objects within the scope of the function?

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You use the same method in a chain by using a concept called Cascades. See my answer. –  P.Brian.Mackey Nov 23 '11 at 19:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This can be achieved with Functional inheritance and cascading. Which is what the OP appears to be going for. No pseudoclassical inheritance.

var string = function (someStartString) {
    var that = {
        append: function (newString) {
              that.currentString += newString;
              return that;//enable cascades        
        }
        ,currentString: someStartString
     };
     return that;
}

Example calls

var textObj = string("robots").append(" are awesome");

console.log(textObj.currentString);//output: robots are awesome

// robots are awesome

var text2Obj = string("robots").append(" are awesome").append(" everytime!");

console.log(text2Obj.currentString);//output: robots are awesome everytime!
share|improve this answer

If you only return string(base + added). It won't work properly. It'll return an Object when you console.log.

var string = function (base) { 
  return { 
    add: function (added) {
      return string(base + added);
  }
 }
}
console.log(string("test ").add("this ").add("thing"));
// outputs [object Object]

Above example fails for what you want. You may try this:

var string = function (base) { 
  return { 
    add: function (added) {
      base += added;
      return string(this.toString());
    },
   toString: function() {
      return base;
    }
 }
}

console.log(string("test ").add("this ").add("thing").toString());
// outputs "test this thing"

This will output correctly.

You also could extend String.prototype and add the add method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I was thinking of extending String as a fix but I hear it's bad to proto over core Objects? Would it be okay to do it anyways in my situation? –  faiizow Nov 23 '11 at 19:19
    
There are two lines of thinking. One says it's bad, one say it's ok. I think you have to look for pros and cons of each one and choose by yourself –  gustavotkg Nov 23 '11 at 20:17

You want to return a string from your add function:

var string = function (base) { 
  return { 
    add: function (added) {
      return string(base + added);
  }
 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. –  faiizow Nov 23 '11 at 19:20

You're returning a plain string, not an instance of your constructor. On plain strings, .add is not available.

You can solve this by returning a new instance, so that the .add function is available on the result:

return string( base + added );

Then it basically goes like this:

string("robots").add(" are awesome").add("everytime!");
string("robots are awesome").add("everytime!");
string("robots are awesomeeverytime!");

instead of:

string("robots").add(" are awesome").add("everytime!");
"robots are awesome".add("everytime!");
<error>
share|improve this answer

You could do something like:

var string = function (base) { 
  return { 
    add: function (added) {
      return string(base + added);
    },
    toString: function() {
      return base;
    }
 }
}

Edit: you may also want to add a toString method.

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