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I have this code in a library:

class Parent
{
    //some data and functions
};

void myfunc(Parent& ref);

and I want to do this code in my application:

class Child : public Parent
{
   // some other data and functions
   void dostuff()
   {
       myfunc(*this);
   }
};

Is it safe to pass *this? (no slicing, no copying, ...) Is it better to call myfunc like this:

myfunc( * ((Parent*)this) )

Note that I don't have control on what happens inside myfunc, in some cases I don't even know what happens inside there.

I used passing-parent-by-pointer many times and I am used to it, but have never used passing-parent-by-reference before.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

myfunc(*this) is fine, so long as myfunc is declared to take a reference -- which it is.

This will not copy the object. It will pass a reference to the original object. Furthermore, it will not slice the object. The reference will be of type Base&, but the object to which it refers will be unchanged.

Just so you know, if you were then to call polymorphic (eg, virtual) methods on this Base&, polymorphism will still work right and do what you'd expect -- just like if you were to call through a pointer. In other words:

Base& b = *derived;
b.SomeVirtualFoo();

...will have the same effect as:

Base* b = derived;
b->SomeVirtualFoo();
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No the first version is correct:

 myfunc(*this);

The second version will probably work in this case but I am not convinced it will work in all cases if multiple inheritance is involved (as you are using a C-Style cast). I have to pull out my standard to look at the exact behavior of C-Style cast.

If it worked passing by pointer the same technique will work if you convert to using references.

Update:

Now that I have read the standard I see the C-Cast will do the correct thing (as a static_cast<> can be used to cast up the class hierarchy from child to parent).

5.4 Explicit type conversion (cast notation)

4 The conversions performed by
— a const_cast (5.2.11),
— a static_cast (5.2.9),
— a static_cast followed by a const_cast,
— a reinterpret_cast (5.2.10), or
— a reinterpret_cast followed by a const_cast,

can be performed using the cast notation of explicit type conversion. The same semantic restrictions and be- haviors apply, with the exception that in performing a static_cast in the following situations the conversion is valid even if the base class is inaccessible:

— a pointer to an object of derived class type or an lvalue or rvalue of derived class type may be explicitly converted to a pointer or reference to an unambiguous base class type, respectively;
— a pointer to member of derived class type may be explicitly converted to a pointer to member of an unambiguous non-virtual base class type;
— a pointer to an object of an unambiguous non-virtual base class type, a glvalue of an unambiguous non-virtual base class type, or a pointer to member of an unambiguous non-virtual base class type may be explicitly converted to a pointer, a reference, or a pointer to member of a derived class type, respectively.

If a conversion can be interpreted in more than one of the ways listed above, the interpretation that appears first in the list is used, even if a cast resulting from that interpretation is ill-formed. If a conversion can be interpreted in more than one way as a static_cast followed by a const_cast, the conversion is ill-formed.

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it says "unambiguous base class type", so perhaps there are some cases in which it doesn't work –  newacct Nov 23 '11 at 22:56

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