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Considering this is only for my homework I don't expect much help but I just can't figure this out and honestly I can't get my head around what's going wrong. Usually I have an idea where the problem is but now I just don't get it.

Long story short: I'm trying to create a valid looking telephone number within a class and then loading it onto an array or list then later on save all of them as string into a folder. When I start the program again I want it to read the file and re-create my class and load it back into the list. (Basically a very simple repository).

Problem is even though I evaluate the stored phone number in the exact same way I validate it as input data ... I get an error which makes no sens.

Another small problem is the fact that when I re-use the data for some reason it creates white spaces in the file which in turn messes my program up badly.

Here I validate phone numbers:

def validateTel(call_ID):
    if isinstance (call_ID, str) == True:
        call_ID = call_ID.replace (" ", "")
        if (len (call_ID) != 10):
            print ("Telephone numbers are 10 digits long")
            return False
        for item in call_ID:
            try:
                int(item)
            except:
                print ("Telephone numbers should contain non-negative digits")
                return False
            else:
                if (int(item) < 0):
                print ("Digits are non-negative")

After this I use it and other non-relevant (to this discussion) data to create an object (class instance) and move them to a list.

Inside my class I have a load from string and a load to string. What they do is take everything from my class object so I can write it to a file using "+" as a separator so I can use string.split("+") and write it to a file. This works nicely, but when I read it ... well it's not working.

    def load_data():
        f = open ("data.txt", "r")
        ch = f.read()
        contact = agenda.contact () # class object
        if ch in (""," ","None"," None"):
           f.close()
           return []  # if the file is empty or has None in some way I pass an empty stack
        else:
           stack = [] # the list where I load all my class objects
        f.seek(0,0)
        for line in f:
            contact.loadFromString(line) # explained bellow
            stack.append(deepcopy(contact))
        f.close()
        return stack

In loadFromString(line) all I do is validate the line (see if the data inside it at least looks OK).

Now here is the place where I validate the string I just read from the file:

def validateString (load_string):
    string = string.split("+")
    if len (string) != 4:
        print ("System error in loading from file: Program skipping segment of corrupt data")
        return False
    if string[0] == "" or string[0] == " " or string[0] == None or string[0] == "None" or string[0] == " None":
        print ("System error in loading from file: Name field cannot be empty")
    try:
        int(string[1])
    except:
        print("System error in loading from file: ID is not integer")
        return False
    if (validateTel(str(string[2])) == False):
        print ("System error in loading from file: Call ID (telephone number)")
        return False
    return True

Small recap: I try to load the data from file using loadFromString(). The only relevant thing that does is it tries to validate my data with validateString(string) in there the only thing that messes me up is the validateTel. But my input data gets validated in the same way my stored data does. They are perfectly identical but it gives a "System error" BUT to give such an error it should have also gave an error in the validate sub-program but it doesn't.

I hope this is enough info because my program is kinda big (for me any way) however the bug should be here somewhere.

I thank anyone brave enough to sift trough this mess.

EDIT:

The class is very simple, it looks like this:

    class contact:
         def __init__ (self, name = None, ID = None, tel = None, address = None):
             self.__name = name
             self.__id = ID
             self.__tel = tel
             self.__address = address

After this I have a series of setters and getters (to modify contacts and to return parts of the abstract data)

Here I also have my loadFromString and loadToString but those work just fine (except maybe they cause a small jump after each line (an empty line) which then kills my program, but that I can deal with)

My problem is somewhere in the validate or a way the repository interacts with it. The point is that even if it gives an error in the loading of the data, first the validate should print an error ... but it doesn't -_-

share|improve this question
1  
please show us the class you are using and the method to turn it into string - do you pickle? something else? I would suspect the problem is with turning the object into a string without using pickle unpickle (or other marshaling methods like json) –  alonisser Nov 23 '11 at 20:47
    
if statement == True: is the same as if statement:, and the last one looks much better, doesn't it? –  juliomalegria Nov 23 '11 at 20:51
1  
I second using pickle. One of the benefits of python is the power of the standard library. For an overview of said standard library, see here. –  Spencer Rathbun Nov 23 '11 at 20:53
    
if variable == None: or if variable == "" is the same as if not variable and this one looks also better (Python is all about beautiful code) –  juliomalegria Nov 23 '11 at 20:54
    
ok, I'll try to use more beautiful code, which I did before this incident where I just tried an asortement of random thing since I had no idea what was wrong. I haven't used pickle yet and I'll research it more for my next asignement but I'm slowly creeping towards my deadline. –  Kalec Nov 23 '11 at 20:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You said I just can't figure this out and honestly I can't get my head around what's going wrong. I think this is a great quote which sums up a large part of programming and software development in general -- dealing with crazy, weird problems and spending a lot of time trying to wrap your head around them.

Figuring out how to turn ridiculously complicated problems into small, manageable problems is the hardest part of programming, but also arguably the most important and valuable.


Here's some general advice which I think might help you:

  • use meaningful names for functions and variables (validateString doesn't tell me anything about what the function does; string tells me nothing about the meaning of its contents)
  • break down problems into small, well-defined pieces
  • specify your data -- what is a phone number? 10 positive digits, no spaces, no punctuation?
  • document/comment the input/output from functions if it's not obvious

Specific suggestions:

  • validateTel could probably be replaced with a simple regular expression match
  • try using json for serialization
  • if you're using json, then it's easy to use lists. I would strongly recommend this over using + as a separator -- that looks highly questionable to me

Example: using a regex

import re

def validateTel(call_ID):
    phoneNumberRegex = re.compile("^\d{10}$") # match a string of 10 digits
    return phoneNumberRegex.match(call_ID)

Example: using json

import json
phoneNumber1, phoneNumber2, phoneNumber3 = ... whatever ...
mylist = [phoneNumber1, phoneNumber2, phoneNumber3]
print json.dumps(mylist)
share|improve this answer
    
it's very late here and I'll try to google half of what you said but sorry I've been using python for 2 months (and well 2 mounts sounds much more than it actually feels) ... re.compile ("\d{10}") is chineese for me I'm afraid, thank you though! –  Kalec Nov 23 '11 at 21:24
    
@kalec see my previous comment about regex and problems - but the rest of his advice especially using json for object serializing (better alternative than pickle I think and future facing for web dev) –  alonisser Nov 23 '11 at 21:31

For starters, don't name your variables after reserved keywords. Instead of calling it string, call it telNumber or s or my_string.

def validateString (my_string):
    working_string= my_string.split("+")
    if len (working_string) != 4:
        print ("System error in loading from file: Program skipping segment of corrupt data")
        return False

The next line I don't really get - what is this If chain for? Accounting for bad data or something? Probably better to check for good data; bad data can come in infinite variety.

    if working_string[0] == "" or working_string[0] == " " or working_string[0] == None or working_string[0] == "None" or string[0] == " None":
        print ("System error in loading from file: Name field cannot be empty")
    try:
        int(string[1])
    except:
        print("System error in loading from file: ID is not integer")
        return False
    if (validateTel(str(working_string[2])) == False):
        print ("System error in loading from file: Call ID (telephone number)")
        return False
    return True

Also, to give you a hint - you may want to look into regular expressions.

share|improve this answer
    
sprry the string was just an example, the name in the program is load_string, thank you though, I think I'll try and correct the code in this example a bit, but the problem is still somewhere in the validate or how it passes information to it. I think. –  Kalec Nov 23 '11 at 21:13
    
regular expressions are so far from where he is right now.. and I remind you of the famous saying: "so you have a problem and you think - hey I can solve this with regular expressions. Now you TWO problems" –  alonisser Nov 23 '11 at 21:15

wow - many problems maybe connected to your problem, also as I commented - I suspect your problem is with turning the telnumber object to string.

f is is file object it won't be equal to anything. if you want to check if the file exists you should just do try /except around the file creation block. like:

try:
   f = open ('data.txt','r') #also could call c=f.read() and check if c equals to none.. not really needed because you can cover an empty file in the next part iterating over f
except:
   return
for line in f: 
    all sorts of stuff
return stack

don't use string reserved word and checking with negative numbers is very strange -is this part of the homeework? and why check by turning to int? this could also break your code - since the rest is a string.

all that said - I still suspect your main problem is with the way you turning the object into string data, It would never remain an instance of unless you used json/pickle/something else to strigfy. an object instance isn't just the class str.

and another thing - keep it simple, python is (also) about elegent and simple coding and you are trying to throw brute force with everything you know at a simple problem. focus, relax and rewrite the program.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I suppose I did go a bit brutishly about writing this, but consider I barely know any classes and commands except for what I manage to google once I run into a problem. But I suppose using pickle would solve some of my issues. –  Kalec Nov 23 '11 at 21:27
    
@Kalec pickle will simplify this part of your work : "then later on save all of them as string into a folder" pickle will allow you to save the data without previously transforming them into a string. But use of pickle is so simple that you must not bother about it for the moment, that will not solve your present problem of validation. Explain more your algorithm , that's what we need –  eyquem Nov 23 '11 at 22:06

I don't perceive all the logic.

For the moment , I can say you that you should correct the code of load_data() as follows:

def load_data():
    f = open ("data.txt", "r")
    ch = f.read()
    contact = agenda.contact () # class object
    if ch in (""," ","None"," None"):
        f.close()
        return []  # if the file is empty or has None in some way I pass an empty stack
    else:
        stack = [] # the list where I load all my class objects
        f.seek(0,0)
        for line in f:
            contact.loadFromString(line) # explained bellow
            stack.append(deepcopy(contact))
        f.close()
        return stack

I don't see how the file-like handler f could ever have a value None or string, so I think you want to test the content of the file -> f.read()

But then, the file's pointer is at its end and must be moved back to the start -> seek(0,0)

I will progressively add complementing considerations when I will understand more the problem.

edit

To test if a file is empty or not

import os.path

if os.path.isfile(filepath) and os.path.getsize(filepath):
    .........

If the file with path filepath doesn't exist, getsize() raises an error. So the preliminary test if os.path.isfile() is necessary to avoid the second condition test to be evaluated.

But if your file can contain the strings "None" or " None" (really ? !), the getsize() will return 4 or 5 in this case.
You should avoid to manage with files containing these kinds of useless data.

edit

In validateTel(), after the instruction if isinstance (call_ID, str) == True: you are sure that call_ID is a string. Then the iteration for item in call_ID: will produce only item being ONE character long, hence it's useless to test if (int(item) < 0): , it will never happen; it could be possible that there is a sign - in the string call_ID but you won't detect it with this last condition.

In fact, as you test each character of callID, it is enough to test if it is one of the digits 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. If the sign - is in calml_ID, it will be detected as not being a digit.

To test if all the character in call_ID, there's an easy way provided by Python: all()

def validateTel(call_ID):
    if isinstance(call_ID, str):
        call_ID = call_ID.replace (" ", "")
        if len(call_ID) != 10:
            print ("A telephone number must be 10 digits long")
            return False
        else:
            print ("Every character in a telephone number must be a digit")
            return all(c in '0123456789' for c in call_ID)
    else:
        print ("call_ID must be a string")
        return False

If one of the character c in call_ID isn't a digit, c in '0123456789' is False and the function all() stop the exam of the following characters and returns False; otherwise, it returns True

share|improve this answer
    
thank you. This function now looks nothing like it used to but I've been messing trying to fix this and now I've made it worse (or at the very least the code looks unhealthy). And thank you, the seek might help but I've manually verified that the string.split() function splits everything as it should –  Kalec Nov 23 '11 at 21:09
    
What is the link between the fact that string.split() acts correctly and the function load_data() ? –  eyquem Nov 23 '11 at 21:13
    
load_data() sends a string to verifyString (load_string) where I split the data and it ends up in a list where I have manually checked it and it's fine ... however the validateTel(call_ID) doesn't seem to agree –  Kalec Nov 23 '11 at 21:21
    
load_data() returns a list , not a string. What is verifyString() , is it validateString() ? –  eyquem Nov 23 '11 at 21:33

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