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Does anyone know the reason why strncat cannot concatenate char initialize to zero? code below

int main()
{
uint8 uibuffer[4] = {0};
uint8 txbuffer[10] = "ab";
uint8 rxbuffer[4] = "cde";

strncat((char*)txbuffer,(char*)uibuffer, 4);
strncat((char*)txbuffer,(char*)rxbuffer, 4);
for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(txbuffer); i += 1)
{
    cout << (int(txbuffer[i]))<<" : "<< char(int(txbuffer[i]))<<endl;
}
return 0;
}

the output now is

97 : a
98 : b
99 : c
100 : d
101 : e
0 : 
0 : 
0 : 
0 : 
0 : 

the desired output would be

97 : a
98 : b
0 : 
0 : 
0 : 
0 :    
99 : c
100 : d
101 : e 
0 : 
share|improve this question
    
strncat stops copying when it encounters a \0 and a string of the form "ab" actually has one of those at its end. You need a custom function to achieve this. –  scorpiodawg Nov 23 '11 at 20:47
    
Is there a reason you can't do this with std::string? –  jrok Nov 23 '11 at 21:08
    
the reason behind is because im concatenating char arrays and integers that need to be converted to char arrays –  Carlitos Overflow Nov 23 '11 at 21:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're looking for memcpy, strings in C end at the first 0 character.

share|improve this answer
2  
memcpy() does not necessarily work either, since the characters beyond the \0 may end up set as junk by the compiler. –  scorpiodawg Nov 23 '11 at 20:47
    
i guess if using memset can solve the issue of junk. –  Carlitos Overflow Nov 23 '11 at 21:08
1  
@scorpiodawg: You mean the remaining 7 uint8s in txbuffer? Those can't have a junk value. –  UncleBens Nov 23 '11 at 21:57

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