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It is often said that the code with lots of templates is going to cause the output to increase in size, but is it really true?

#include <iostream>

#if 0
void foo( const int &v)
{
    std::cout<<v<<std::endl;
}
#else
template< typename T >
void foo( const T &v)
{
    std::cout<<v<<std::endl;
}
#endif

int main ()
{
    foo(50);
}

The example above produces outputs of different sizes (6.19k with the function, and 6.16k with a template function). Why is the version with a template smaller?

If it matters, I am using g++ 4.6.1, with next options -O3 -Wextra -Wall -pedantic. I am not sure what is the output of other compilers.

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8  
In this trivial example the sizes are relatively consistent. Try the same example where the template has to be expanded for several (hundred) types. –  Chad Nov 23 '11 at 20:55
    
It's just as if you write a new class/function for every type the template is instantiated with. It's the same as if you made functions with different names, or whatever. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 23 '11 at 20:56
3  
Also, try an example where the template isn't a one-liner. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 23 '11 at 20:57
    
@Chad I am aware of that (every specialization increases in size), but that is not what I ask. –  BЈовић Nov 23 '11 at 21:40
1  
@Chad: If you are going to compare apples and orages at least compare the same number of oranges. Do the same thing with normal code. Now you have to write several hundred versions of the function (presumably with a lot of copying and pasting). You end up with the same executable the difference is the source code is several hundred times larger. –  Loki Astari Nov 23 '11 at 22:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Perhaps because foo in your example has external linkage so that it is emitted into your executable even if the call is inlined.

For the template, if the call is inlined there is no reason to emit an implicitly instantiated function template specialization.

Try making foo an inline function or making it static. If you want to emit the function template specialization you need to explicitly instantiate it

#else
template< typename T >
void foo( const T &v)
{
    std::cout<<v<<std::endl;
}
template void foo(const int&);
#endif

Doing this, my measures give the exact same size for the non-template function and the function template version.

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This is correct. Even putting it in the nameless namespace is producing exactly the same output. –  BЈовић Nov 23 '11 at 21:42

When we say templates are generating bigger code, what we actually mean is they are bigger compared to other forms of dynamic or static polymorphism such as virtual functions, function pointers, selection, function overload, etc...

For instance, let's suppose you have a very big class template and only one place in some code is there a difference between int and float. Well, a naive compiler will duplicate the whole class and code and it will end up taking twice the size (it's not really happening like this but for the purpose of this example let's suppose). If you had just overloaded that one method, only that part of the code would have been duplicated.

This also have the nasty side effect of making the compile time longer since it has to evaluate twice the amount of code.

What you have to keep in mind is that every time a new type is used for a template code, the whole code gets regenerated with the new type, while other methods might simply switch pointers here and there.

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That's a false analagy. If you replaced the template code with normal code you still have two versions of the code, one version for integers and one for float. The difference is you have twice as much source code. –  Loki Astari Nov 23 '11 at 22:32
    
Seems like the correct solution is to make that one function a template function. –  David Stone May 28 '12 at 15:14

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