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Ok so as I understand my code, I created a promoSlides object, I a private function called init and in the return of a js closure (which I am not too familiar with) I returned init so I can use it outside globally kind of. When I run the file I get promoSlides is undefined, says error console of FF. I am not sure where I went wrong. I am new to this so probably something is wrong. Oh and slides was defined in my original doc but I took it out for simplicity sake

var Slider = (function (name) {return name;}(Slider || {}));

Slider.promoSlides = ( function()
{
var slides;

var init = function(s)
{
    slides = s;
    sortSlides();
    startTimer();
    addListeners();
};
return 
{
    init : function a(s)
    {
        init(s);
    }
};

})();

$(document).ready(function(){
    Slider.promoSlides.init(slides);
});
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1  
"I defined a private function [...] so i can use it outside globally kind of": "use globally" and "private function" are usually pretty mutually exclusive concepts ;) –  Richard JP Le Guen Nov 23 '11 at 20:59
    
Check out blog.izs.me/post/2353458699/… for a good rant on semi-colon insertion rules and line-break etiquette in JavaScript. –  Jonathan Lonowski Nov 23 '11 at 21:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Semicolon insertion strikes again!

return 
{
    init : function a(s)
    {
        init(s);
    }
};

needs to be

return {
    init : function a(s)
    {
        init(s);
    }
};

This is a result of a "feature" in JavaScript that looks at your line with just return on it, and says: "oh, you forgot your semicolon, I'll add it for you."

It changes return to return; so your function now returns undefined, and then you have some naked JSON sitting below it, which is the source of your error. Douglas Crockford actually describes this as one of the "awful parts" of JavaScript.

So the moral of the story is: always put your opening brace on the same line when you're coding in JavaScript.

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Beat me by 3 seconds! –  nrabinowitz Nov 23 '11 at 21:00
    
@nrabinowitz - if I had a dollar for every time that happened to me :) –  Adam Rackis Nov 23 '11 at 21:04
    
oh wow that fixed the issue, thanks. i did not know that one before –  Huangism Nov 23 '11 at 21:07
    
@user1058134 - you look like you already have a decent handle on JavaScript - you might want to take a look at that Crockford book I linked to in my answer. It's about 100 pages long, and I've never learned more from a programming book than from that one. –  Adam Rackis Nov 23 '11 at 21:12

Your problem is the deadly "assumed semicolon" in the return line:

return //; <-- Javascript puts an implicit EOL here
{
    init : function a(s)
    {
        init(s);
    }
};

Change to

return {
    init : function a(s)
    {
        init(s);
    }
};

and your code should run.

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yep it works thanks, the other beat you to it so i elected him as the correct answer –  Huangism Nov 23 '11 at 21:11

The "assumed semicolon" issue was already described above. But don't use that much function calls!

var init = function() { ... };
return {
    init : init
};

works as well, or even shorter:

var slides; // unused variable ???
return {
    init: function init(s) {
        slides = s;
        sortSlides();
        startTimer();
        addListeners();
    }
}
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