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I was checking out the source of apples Video recording example and I came across this example project.

http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#samplecode/AVCam/Introduction/Intro.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/DTS40010112

Now it looks nice and does what it is supposed to do effectively, but I was little surprised to see no app delegate class.

I dont full understand what is going on here.

Can somebody explain? Are there any benefits drawbacks to what was done here? Sometimes I use

appDelegate = (Test_AppDelegate *)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];

to store some data that I need to be able to reach through out my app. Can this still be done when an app is designed in the way AVCam was?

Hope some of you find this as interesting as I did.

Thanks, -Code

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Using the AppDelegate the way you describe is IMHO dirty, hackish and often plain wrong. If you need a singleton, create one and don't misuse the AppDelegate for that. The fact that the provided sample is not implementing an AppDelegate is indeed rare but certainly fully functional and valid - why implementing something that does not do anything the standard UIApplication does already. –  Till Nov 23 '11 at 22:02

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like that example just implements a UIViewController subclass. While an application in the real world is almost certain to have a application delegate, for a simple example designed to show the use of a technology that's not always needed.

In other words, don't look at an example like this for guidance on the design of a complete application. Look at it for guidance on how to use a specific technology.

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