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I want to hide or show my spinner depending on what is selected in the radio button. The spinner is displayed in a table. If the user chose yes (radio button), it will display the table which the spinner is in, if the user chose no (radio button), it will hide the table the spinner is in.

I researched on Google the best way to use style in JavaScript and the one I most commonly found was using (variable).style.(css property).

I have tried this but it hasn't worked. What I want to know is that am I coding this wrong (it is not showing anything in error console and it seems right with the examples I have followed) or do I need to do it another way when it comes to display and hiding tables?

Below is my HTML code:

    <table id="tblWeight">
    <tr>
    <th>6: Provide a Total Weight for your Session</th>
    <td><input type="radio" name="weightChoice" value="yes" onClick="getWeight()"/> Yes</td>
        <td><input type="radio" name="weightChoice" value="No" onClick="getWeight()"/> No</td>
        </tr>
        </table>
        <div id="radioAlert"></div>
        <br/>
    <table>
    <tr>
    <th>Weight (%):</th>
        <td class="spinner"><input type="text" class="spinnerWeight" name="txtWeight" id="txtWeight"></td>
        <td><button class="scrollBtn" id="btnWeightUp" type="button"><img src="Images/black_uppointing_triangle.png" alt="Increase" /></button>
        <button class="scrollBtn" id="btnWeightDown" type="button"><img src="Images/black_downpointing_triangle.png" alt="Decrease" /></button></td>
        </tr>
        </table>
        <div id="weightAlert"></div>
        <br/>
        <table><tr><th>7: Module:</th>
    <td><?php echo $moduleHTML; ?></td>
        </tr>
        </table>

Below is JavaScript code:

function getWeight() {
    var weightChoice = document.getElementsByName("weightChoice");               
    var textWeight = document.getElementById("txtWeight");
    var tableWeight = document.getElementById("tblWeight");

    if(weightChoice[0].checked == true){
        tableWeight.style.visibility=="visible";
        textWeight.value == 0;
    } else {
        tableWeight.style.visibility=="hidden";
        textWeight.value == 0;
    }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your assignment statements are written with doubled "=" characters, which makes them not be assignment statements.

        if(weightChoice[0].checked == true){
            tableWeight.style.visibility = "visible";
            textWeight.value = 0;
        }else{
            tableWeight.style.visibility = "hidden";
            textWeight.value = 0;
        }

The "==" is a comparison operator, so your statements were not syntactically erroneous and thus no errors were reported.

share|improve this answer

You're using == to assign, when == is an equality comparison operator. It should be =:

function getWeight() {
    var weightChoice = document.getElementsByName("weightChoice");               
    var textWeight = document.getElementById("txtWeight");
    var tableWeight = document.getElementById("tblWeight");

    if(weightChoice[0].checked) {
        tableWeight.style.visibility = "visible";
        textWeight.value = 0;
    } else {
        tableWeight.style.visibility = "hidden";
        textWeight.value = 0;
    }
}

Also, == true, which I removed, is never necessary. I repeat - never. Anywhere you use == true, just take it out.

share|improve this answer
    
There are occasions where if( x == true ) will not provide the same result as if( x ), so I wouldn't be quite too quick to recommend taking it out anywhere it is used. –  RightSaidFred Nov 23 '11 at 22:19
    
@RightSaidFred: Such as...? I think you're confusing loose equality == with identity ===. (I know, there are some cases in assignment like someObject.property = a == true; but that's the same as saying someObject.property = Boolean(a); or various other things that are a lot more clear.) –  minitech Nov 23 '11 at 22:21
    
Because the loose equality performs a toNumber conversion, while the if( x ) will use toBoolean, it is possible to get different results. The two examples I can think of are comparing to a String with only whitespace, and comparing to an empty Array. The toBoolean will be true for those, but the toNumber will result in 0, which is not == true. –  RightSaidFred Nov 23 '11 at 22:25
1  
@RightSaidFred: Oh, right! Oops :P I suppose I just never imagined anyone doing == true with an empty array. –  minitech Nov 23 '11 at 22:27
    
Yeah, I'd imagine it would be pretty rare that anyone would actually be using == true in either of those cases. –  RightSaidFred Nov 23 '11 at 22:32

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